Davidson and Farrier Family Histories

This is a site for us to upload family histories and pictures of our Davidson and Farrier family ancestors. I have not written most of the histories, although I have put together the timelines. The histories have been gathered from various sources, so I can't vouch for the accuracy of their information.

If you recognize any of these people and have information to add or correct, please post a comment, including your email address if you wish, so we can be in touch. I would love to connect with other descendants of these family members.

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

Josephine C. Vohnoutka, 1903-1980

  • Born: 6 November 1903 (Stanley, Morris, New Jersey)
  • Died: 15 January 1980 (Irvington, Essex, New Jersey)
  • Parents: Joseph Vohnoutka and Antonette Benesch
  • Spouse: Frank Hiebel (md. 26 February 1927 Summit,, New Jersey)
  • Children: Doris Hiebel, Lorraine F. Hiebel, Joan Carol Hiebel, Audrey Jean Hiebel, Linda Helen Hiebel


1903 November 6
Born, only daughter and oldest child of Joseph Vohnoutka and Antonette Benesch in Stanley, Morris, New Jersey.  [1]


Josephine with brother, Joseph.


1916 (abt.)
Age 13
Suffers a concussion in a sledding accident and never returned to school.  [2]

29 June 1916
1923 June 27
Age 19
Death of mother, Antonie Benesch Vohnoutka in Chatham, Morris, New Jersey  [3]

1927 February 26
Age 23
Marries Frank Hiebel in Summit, New Jersey.  [4]



Josephine, date and place unknown.

1928 September 21
Age 24
Daughter Doris born in Newark, Essex, New Jersey.  She lives only until October 22. [2]


Josephine with nurse and baby (which one?).

1930 April 7
Age 26
Living in Irvington, Essex, New Jersey with husband, Frank, mother-in-law Rose Hiebel, and cousin John Vohnoutka.  [5]

1930 April 22
Age 26
Daughter Lorraine F. born in Newark, Essex, New Jersey.[2]

1932 April 15
Age 28
Daughter Joan Carol born in Orange, Essex, New Jersey.  Residence:  256 40th St., Irvington, N.J.  [6]



Josephine with Lorraine and Joan, September 1935.

Josephine holding Joan, about 1935
1936 May 13
Age 32
Daughter Audrey Jean born in Irvington, Essex, New Jersey.  [7]

Back: Josephine, Frank, friend holding Audrey
Front:  Joan, Lorraine
1938 January 30
Age 34
Daughter Lorraine dies of Gaucher’s disease.  [8]

1940 April 15
Age 36
Living in Irvington, Essex, New Jersey with husband Frank, and daughters Joan (age 8) and Audrey (age 3), and father, Joseph Vohnoutka, and mother-in-law, Rosalie Hiebel.  [9]

1946 January 30
Age 42
Daughter Linda Helen born in Newark, Essex, New Jersey. [2]


Josephine, about 1960.

1966 July 7
Age 62
Death of father, Joseph Vohnoutka at Irvington, Essex, New Jersey. [10, 11]

Frank and Josephine, date unknown
1980 January 15
Age 76
Dies of bronchial pneumonia and histocytic lymphoma in Irvington, Essex, New Jersey.  [12]

* * *


Memories of daughter, Joan Carol Hiebel Farrier:

"Josephine “Josie” Catherine “Mama” Vohnoutka was the only daughter of Joseph and Nellie. During the summers, Mama was sent to a relative's farm to help with the chores. She told me never to get serious with a farmer. “You don’t know what hard work is until you’re on a farm.” Mama had a concussion in a sledding at the age of 13 and was kept out of school for a year. She didn’t want to return to school and be in the same grade as the 13-year-olds so she didn’t. (I never understood this, because Mama went to a one-room school.) Mama went to work in a factory. When her mother died, her father asked her to stay home and be a homemaker for him and her brother.

"Mama received a great deal of help from Aunt Josie Jackson, my Grandma Nellie’s sister. On one occasion, after Mama’s father and brother complained about not enough salt in their food, Aunt Josie suggested Mama put half a box of salt in at the next meal. Mama did and there were never any complaints again. (Mama told me this story.)

"After Mother and Daddy were married and the children started coming, Mother started a support group. The ladies would meet each week at each other’s home and furnish juice and cookies to all the children. I didn’t realize until I asked my mother how I was related to all these Aunts that I found out only two were related. The others were friends of Mama. We, the kids, called all the ladies “Aunt” out of respect. The ladies’ husbands were our “Uncles.”

"Mama eventually developed severe osteoporosis, fracturing her hip at about 63. The doctors tried to repair the hip, but when they tried the femur shattered. Mama also had rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer. Even with all this, when Mama’s friends came to cheer her up, her friends went home feeling better. Mama had cheered them up. (This I heard from her friends.) She died in 1980 at 76 of bronchial pneumonia and histocytic lymphoma."

--Joan Carol Hiebel Farrier
---------------------------------------------

[1]  NJ Bureau of Vital Statistics birth certificate no. 35728.

[2]  Personal knowledge of daughter Joan Carol Hiebel Farrier.

[3]  Letter from Audrey Hiebel Mann to Joan Hiebel Farrier

[4]  New Jersey Certificate of Marriage - Bureau of Vital Statistics - #393.

[5]  "United States Census, 1930," index and images,  FamilySearch  (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X4DX-QBC : accessed 16 Feb 2013), Frank Hiebel, Irvington, Essex, New Jersey; citing enumeration district (ED) 0449, sheet 7A, family 138, NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1330.

[6]  Health Department, Orange, N.J., Certificate of Birth, filed 21 April 1932.

[7]  "United States Social Security Death Index," index,  FamilySearch  (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JR7P-6WB : accessed 16 Feb 2013), Audrey J Mann, 15 July 1999; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[8]  Town of Irvington New Jersey Record of Death, filed 1/31/38.

[9]  "United States Census, 1940," index and images,  FamilySearch  (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/K45Y-C1Q : accessed 16 Feb 2013), Frank Hiebel, Ward 1, Irvington, Irvington Town, Essex, New Jersey, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 7-159A, sheet 6B, family 133, NARA digital publication T627, roll 2334.

[10]  Town of Irvington New Jersey Record of Death, filed 7/8/66

[11]  "United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VMGT-JJF : accessed 08 Nov 2012), Joseph Vohnoutka, July 1966; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[12]  NJ State Dept. of Health death certificate, no. 06252.

Tuesday, May 19, 2009

Frank Hiebel, 1905-1981

  • Born: 5 April 1905 (Newark, Essex, New Jersey)
  • Died: 10 October 1981 (Irvington, Essex, New Jersey)
  • Parents: Henry Hiebl and Rosie or Rozie Sevcovic
  • Spouse: Josephine C. Vohnoutka (md. 26 February 1927 Summit, New Jersey)
  • Children: Doris Hiebel, Lorraine Hiebel, Joan Carol Hiebel, Audrey Jean Hiebel, Linda Helen Hiebel

1905 April 5
Born in Newark, Essex, New Jersey, ninth child of Henry Hiebl and Rosie or Rozie Sevcovic  [1, 2]


Frank as a child.


1926 June 21
Age 21
Death of father, Henry Hiebl in Fairmont, Newark, New Jersey [4]

1927 Feb 26
Age 21
Marries Josephine C. Vohnoutka in Summit, New Jersey.  Lists occupation as “Buyer.”  [3]

Frank and Josephine Hiebel on their honeymoon.
Tremore Hotel in Atlantic City, New Jersey in background.


1928 September 21
Age 23
Daughter Doris born in Newark, Essex, New Jersey.  She lived only until October 22.  [2]

1930 April 7
Age 25
Living in Irvington, Essex, New Jersey with wife, Josephine, mother Rose Hiebel, and wife’s cousin John Vohnoutka.  Lists occupation as “Clerk, printing co.”  [5]

1930 April 22
Age 25
Daughter Lorraine F. born in Newark, Essex, New Jersey [4]

1932 April 15
Age 27
Daughter Joan Carol born in Orange, Essex, New Jersey.  Residence:  256 40th St., Irvington, N.J.  Occupation:  Salesman. [4]

1936 May 13
Age 31
Daughter Audrey Jean born, Irvington, Essex, New Jersey  [6]

Back:  Josephine, Frank, a friend holding Audrey
Front:  Joan, Lorraine
1937 spring
Age 32
Takes picture of Hindenburg a few weeks before its tragic crash in May





1938 January 30
Age 32
Daughter Lorraine died of Gaucher’s disease  [7]

1940 April 15
Age 35
Living in Irvington, Essex, New Jersey with wife, Josephine, and daughters Joan (age 8) and Audrey (age 3), and father-in-law, Joseph Vohnoutka, and mother, Rosalie Hiebel.  [8]

1946 Jan. 30
Age 40
Daughter Linda Helen born, Newark, Essex, New Jersey [4]

1950 September 12
Age 45
Death of mother, Rosalie Sevcovic Hiebel in Irvington, Essex, New Jersey  [9]

Frank in Ansco film advertisement in journal "Radiology," June 1951, p. 11.
1968
Age 63
Retired from working as salesman for Ansco Photo [4]

Frank and Josephine, date unknown.

1980 January 15
Age 74
Wife Josephine dies of bronchial pneumonia and histocytic lymphoma in Irvington, Essex, New Jersey. [10]

1981 October 10
Age 76
Dies of acute respiratory failure in Irvington, Essex, New Jersey.  Lists occupation as salesman of x-ray equipment (General Analine and Film Co. of Binghamton, New York.)  Was buried at Hollywood Memorial Park in Union, New Jersey. [1, 11]

* * *
Memories of daughter, Joan Carol Hiebel Farrier:

"Frank “Daddy” Hiebel was the ninth child of Rozie and Frank Hubl. The spelling of the family name was changed by Frank’s sisters. The family lived in a German/Czech neighborhood. With the change the Germans had a better chance of pronouncing it correctly. In Czechoslovakia, children were taught spelling only to the third grade. Once you learned the rules you could spell anything.

"Frank was abused by his sister Anna’s husband. Frank was studying violin and Anna’s husband eventually became his teacher. When Frank played a wrong note Anna’s husband hit him on the fingers until they bled. There was more but Daddy didn’t talk about it. I do know that when Anna died, the family never spoke to her husband or Anna’s son again.

"As a young teenager Frank was sickly and very thin. The doctor suggested he go to the country for fresh air and good food. Through the Czech network, the Vohnoutka family was found. When Frank arrived, there was a spread on the table including meat, potatoes and vegetables. He thought Mrs. Vohnoutka had fixed a special meal for his first night. The feast was every night! Frank lived with the family for a couple of years. The daughter, Josie (my Mama), had a crush on Frank, according to the son Joseph Vohnoutka. Joe really gave Frank a hard time for a while, but as time went on Daddy won Joe over (according to Daddy).

"Frank knew Josie liked him when, as he was leaving to go back home, Josie cried. Josie asked if he would come back to visit. His reply was “If you bake me a cake, the one with heavy cream and egg white icing with dark chocolate on top.” Frank did visit and the cake was waiting for him.

"Frank and Josie married February 26, 1927, they moved in with Baba on the condition that Mama would do the cooking. I really don’t think Baba was upset with this arrangement. Baba was then able to devote more time to her knitting and organizations. The only complaint I heard about this arrangement from Mama was when Mama came home with her first born and all five people living in the house expected her to go grocery shopping and fix dinner. She did cook the dinner, but only after someone else did the shopping. Frank and Josie had five daughters. The first died at about 14 days because the outlet of the stomach was closed. The second, Lorraine, died at 8 years of a rare chronic congenital disease (Gaucher’s disease): a disorder of lipid metabolism, associated with enlarged spleen.

"Frank had seven different jobs during his working years. These are the ones I remember:
· Soda Jerk as a young man.
· Caddie at a golf course, while living with the Vohnoutkas.
· Musician with his own orchestra.
· Photographer: mostly brides in the beginning, then food for advertising (spraying the fruit with varnish to make it shine), then jewelry laid on black velvet. Frank took a picture of the German zeppelin Hindenburg on its next-to-last arrival in the U.S. Ten days later it exploded on its approach to land. (I have a newspaper clipping of the picture.) When the WPA started, he worked for them as a photographer. I remember him telling me that on one occasion he hung out of a plane to get a good picture. It wasn’t until he got on the ground he realized what he did.
· X-ray technician during WWII, to find any flaws in guns, all sizes.
· Sales Representative for Ansco X-ray film, his last employer.

"Daddy was active in the local civic and political scene: Town treasurer, chairman of the Board of Adjustment, Member of the Sinking Fund Commission, Democrat District Leader, superintendent of the Methodist Church Sunday School, member of the Salvation Army advisory board, Rotary Club, and Master Mason of a Masonic Lodge."

--Joan Carol Hiebel Farrier
---------------------------------------------------

[1]  "United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JPC3-L3X : accessed 16 Feb 2013), Frank Hiebel, October 1981; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[2]  New Jersey, Department of Health, Bureau of Vital Statistics birth certificate, stamped no. 906.

[3]  New Jersey Certificate of Marriage - Bureau of Vital Statistics - #393.

[4]  Personal knowledge of Joan Carol Hiebel Farrier, a daughter.

[5]  "United States Census, 1930," index and images,  FamilySearch  (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X4DX-QBC : accessed 16 Feb 2013), Frank Hiebel, Irvington, Essex, New Jersey; citing enumeration district (ED) 0449, sheet 7A, family 138, NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1330.

[6]  "United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JR7P-6WB : accessed 16 Feb 2013), Audrey J Mann, 15 July 1999; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[7]  Town of Irvington New Jersey Record of Death, filed 1/31/38.

[8]  "United States Census, 1940," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/K45Y-C1Q : accessed 16 Feb 2013), Frank Hiebel, Ward 1, Irvington, Irvington Town, Essex, New Jersey, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 7-159A, sheet 6B, family 133, NARA digital publication T627, roll 2334.

[9]  Town of Irvington New Jersey Record of Death, filed 9/13/1950 .

[10]  NJ State Dept. of Health death certificate, no. 06252.

[11]  New Jersey State Department of Health Certificate of Death, stamped no. 50919.

Marie Lillian Zimmermann, 1892-1975


  • Born: 23 May 1892 (Clifton, Passaic, New Jersey)
  • Died: 12 October 1975 (Orange, Essex, New Jersey)
  • Parents: John Zimmermann and Agnes Marie Benisch
  • Spouse: Walter Halliday Farrier, Sr. (md. 14 June 1916 Brooklyn, Kings, New York)
  • Children: Miriam (Dolly) Farrier, Claire-Jane Farrier, Walter Halliday Farrier, Jr.
1892 May 23
Born in Clifton, Passaic, New Jersey, one of five children of John Zimmermann and Agnes Marie Benisch.  According to her daughter, Clair-Jane Farrier, Marie was the only child born in the United States.  [1]

Marie, sometime before her marriage.

About 1896
Age 3/4
Death of father, John Zimmermann.  [2]

1916 June 14
Age 24
Marries Walter Halliday Farrier (Sr.) in New York.  Address:  255 Pearl St., Brooklyn, New York  [3]

1917 June 5
Age 25
Husband fills out draft registration card, indicating that Marie is pregnant.  [4]

1918 June 23
Age 26
Daughter Miriam (Dolly) is born in New York  [5]

1920 January 2
Age 27
Living in Clifton City, Passaic, New Jersey with husband Walter, daughter Mirian M. (age 1-1/2), and mother, Marie Zimmermann.  Occupation:  Professional Singer.  [6]

About 1924/25
Age 32/33
Death of mother, Agnes Marie Benisch Zimmermann. [6]

1925 April 17
Age 32
Daughter Claire-Jane is born in New Jersey.  [7]

1930 April 2
Age 37
Living in Newark, New Jersey with husband Walter and daughters Miriam (age 11) and Claire Jane (age 4) [8]

1932 February 8
Age 39
Son Walter Halliday Farrier, Jr., is born in Newark, Essex, New Jersey. [6]

1940 April 17
Age 47
Living in Maplewood, Essex, New Jersey with husband Walter and children Mirian M (age 21), Clare Jan (age 15), and Walter H (age 8).  [9]

1942
Age 50 (abt.)
Per husband’s draft registration card, is living at 20 Claremont Ave., Maplewood, Essex, New Jersey.  [10]

Walter and Marie Farrier, spring, 1955
1971 August 6
Age 79
Husband dies at Point Pleasant, Ocean, New Jersey [11, 12]

1975 October 12
Age 83
Dies at Orange, Essex, New Jersey.  Residence at death was Plainfield, Union, New Jersey.  Her body was donated to Rutgers Medical School (in New Brunswick, New Jersey). [13, 14]


* * *

"Marie was on scholarship 1914-1916 at what was then the “Institute of Musical Art” (which merged with the Juilliard Graduate School in 1926 to become the Juilliard School of Music) with a double major in piano and voice. She did not graduate, but sang in the “New York Opera Company” (which still exists) in the role of Hansel in Humperdinck’s “Hansel and Gretel.” She also concertized (as “Marie Merman” because of the strong public anti-German sentiment), including at “Cinema” theaters between showings of the then-short, silent, black-and-white new medium of film."
--Walter Halliday Farrier, Jr.

-----------------------------------------------
[1] "New Jersey, Births and Christenings, 1660-1980," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FCTG-QMX : accessed 15 Feb 2013), John Zimmerman in entry for Marie L. Zimmerman, 23 May 1891; citing reference v 39 p 116, FHL microfilm 494221.

[2]  Personal knowledge of daughter, Claire-Jane Farrier Young.

[3]  State of New York Certificate and Record of Marriage no. 6706.

[4]  Ancestry.com.  U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2005.

[5]  "United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VSJF-HZH : accessed 15 Feb 2013), Dolly F Kelley, July 1993; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[6]  “United States Census, 1920," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M4Y9-5F2 : accessed 15 Feb 2013), Walter H Farrier, , Passaic, New Jersey; citing enumeration district (ED) , sheet 1B, family 15, NARA microfilm publication T625, FHL microfilm 1821062.

[7]  Personal knowledge of son, Walter Halliday Farrier, Jr.

[8]  "United States Census, 1930," index and images,  FamilySearch  (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X4DG-5WQ : accessed 15 Feb 2013), Walter Farrier, Newark (Districts 1-250), Essex, New Jersey; citing enumeration district (ED) 0103, sheet 1A, family 4, NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1335.

[9]  “United States Census, 1940,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/K4RM-ZBB : accessed 16 Feb 2013), Walter H Farrier, Maplewood Township, Essex, New Jersey, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 7-211, sheet 13B, family 281, NARA digital publication T627, roll 2336.

[10]  Ancestry.com. U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

[11]  NJ State Dept. of Health death certificate State File #43532.

[12]  "United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JPZW-YNB : accessed 04 Feb 2013), Walter Farrier, August 1971; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[13]  NJ State Dept. of Health death certificate, state file no. 49660.

[14]  "United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JPZM-ZQM : accessed 16 Feb 2013), Marie Farrier, October 1975; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

Friday, April 3, 2009

Walter Halliday Farrier, Sr.




1894 August 2
Born Brooklyn, Kings, New York, the fourth of five children  [1]

1908 (abt)
Age 14
His father has nervous breakdown due to business partner absconding.  Leaves home to earn money, lives with brother Albert, who is an engineer for Thomas Edison.  Finishes high school at night and then puts himself through the Pace Institute, a business college, in New York.  He works for a time as an accountant in an auditing firm in New York.  [2]

1916 June 14
Age 21
Marries Marie Lillian Zimmermann in New York.  Lists his occupation as “timekeeper.”  Address:  255 Pearl St., Brooklyn, New York  [3]

Walter H. Farrier - date unknown


1917 June 5
Age 22
Fills out WWI draft registration card.  Lists occupation as “Timekeeper at Edison Electric Company.”  His address is 2532 Madison St. New York.  Under dependents, he lists  “wife pregnant, mother.”  He describes himself as tall, medium build, blue eyes, and brown hair.”  He lists his military experience as three years as a sergeant in the Field Artillery Branch of the New York State National Guard.  [4]

Daughter Claire Jane says that “In WWI he rode around the armory where he trained people in Brooklyn (Fort Harrison?) and played polo there.”

1918 June 23
Age 23
Daughter Miriam (Dolly) is born in New York  [5]

1920 January 2
Age 25
Living in Clifton City, Passaic, New Jersey with wife Marie, daughter Mirian M. (age 1-1/2), and mother-in-law, Marie Zimmermann.  Occupation:  Public accountant.  [6]

1920 December
Age 26
Death of father, John McCullagh Farrier [7]

1925 April 17
Age 30
Daughter Claire Jane is born in New Jersey [2]

1926 August
Age 32
Death of mother, Annie Brewster Beach Farrier [8]

1930 April 2
Age 35
Living in Newark, New Jersey with wife Marie and daughters Miriam (age 11) and Claire Jane (age 4).  [9]

1932 February 8
Age 37
Son Walter Halliday Farrier, Jr., is born in Newark, Essex, New Jersey. [2]

1933 (abt.)
Age 39 (abt.)
Helps bring Albert Einstein to America.  See story below. [2]

1940 April 17
Age 45
Living in Maplewood, Essex, New Jersey with wife Marie and children Mirian M (age 21), Clare Jan (age 15), and Walter H (age 8). [10]

1942
Age 47
Fills out WWII draft registration card.  Lists address as 20 Claremont Ave., Maplewood, Essex, New Jersey.  Is employed by Louis Bamberger, owner of Bamberg’s Department Store (which is now owned by Macy’s).  His son, Walter, Jr., says he was an auditor there and that he also managed the personal funds of Mr. Bamberger.  After Mr. Bamberger died, he worked for Federated Department Stores (which includes Macy’s, Lord & Taylor, etc.).  When Federated Department Stores moved from New York City to Cincinnati, he went to work as a business manager at Bloomingdale’s and retired as its comptroller. [11]

1943 December 11
Age 49
Is a charter member of the Green Pond Sailing Club (later Green Pond Yacht Club)  [12]

Walter H. Farrier about 1950
Walter and Marie Farrier - 1955

1971 August 6
Age 76
Dies at Point Pleasant, Ocean, New Jersey.  He donated his body to Rutgers Medical School (in New Brunswick, New Jersey) for anatomical purposes. [13, 14]


According to son, Walter, Jr., he was athletic, playing basketball, handball, billiards, and pool. During WWI, he did weight lifting. He was not a church-goer, but did teach principles of honesty and integrity to his children. Walter remembers “extremely well being in the car, and my father saying at one point that the important thing is that when you walk down the street, you want people to raise their hands to greet you or salute you, rather than to raise their hands to hit you.”

He was quite involved with his children. Walter, Jr., remembers being read to regularly and that his father took saxophone lessons and trumpet lessons with his son. He also played piano by ear occasionally.

Walter, Jr’s, remembrance: “I remember hearing in those days in New York, a man wore a hat, period. And if a person set out to do auditing at some client’s firm where they were going to audit the books, if the auditor was without a hat, it was not uncommon for the manager of that company to call back to the auditing firm, “Send us a man who is properly dressed.” My father hated to wear hats, and he had only one Hamburg, a very nice hat, that didn’t even fit him. And for many, many, many years he carried this one Hamburg. It was not practical, because it didn’t fit on his head. But he had a hat. So he would carry that hat around.”

Regarding the bringing of Einstein to America, Walter, Jr, says: “In fact, when Einstein was brought over, my father was instrumental in the arrangements. Einstein didn’t want to meet the press, and so when he was coming, there was considerable fanfare, because he was well-known as being a great theoretician, ‘cause his big advances were made when he was quite young. You know, in the 1915/1916 era. He was already an outstanding theorist, scientific theorist. So, when he came to the United States in the ‘30s, my father was to arrange the thing, and so they arranged to have Einstein brought in on a little launch from the ocean liner, so he that wouldn’t be there when the ocean liner met where all the press would be waiting to interview him. They brought him in to another dock, inconspicuously, to avoid the press, ‘cause Einstein didn’t want to have that reception.”
--------------------------------------------------

[1]  "New York, Births and Christenings, 1640-1962," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FDYV-YBF : accessed 04 Feb 2013), Walter Halliday Farrier, 23 Aug 1894; citing reference , FHL microfilm 1324420.

[2]  Personal knowledge of son, Walter Halliday Farrier, Jr.

[3]  State of New York Certificate and Record of Marriage no. 6706.

[4]  Ancestry.com.  U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2005.

[5]  "United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VSJF-HZH : accessed 15 Feb 2013), Dolly F Kelley, July 1993; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[6]  "United States Census, 1920," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M4Y9-5F2 : accessed 15 Feb 2013), Walter H Farrier, , Passaic, New Jersey; citing enumeration district (ED) , sheet 1B, family 15, NARA microfilm publication T625, FHL microfilm 1821062.

[7]  Burial record for John M. Farrier at http://www.green-wood.com/burial_results/index.php  Viewed online October 2012.

[8]  Burial record for Annie B. Farrier at http://www.green-wood.com/burial_results/index.php  Viewed online October 2012.

[9]  "United States Census, 1930," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X4DG-5WQ : accessed 15 Feb 2013), Walter Farrier, Newark (Districts 1-250), Essex, New Jersey; citing enumeration district (ED) 0103, sheet 1A, family 4, NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1335.

[10]  “United States Census, 1940,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/K4RM-ZBB : accessed 16 Feb 2013), Walter H Farrier, Maplewood Township, Essex, New Jersey, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 7-211, sheet 13B, family 281, NARA digital publication T627, roll 2336.

[11]  Ancestry.com. U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

[12]  Green Pond Yacht Club Constitution and By-Laws, adopted December 11, 1943.  Viewed online at http://www.greenpondyachtclub.com/uploads/GPYC_By-Laws.pdf February 2013.

[13]  NJ State Dept. of Health death cert. State File #43532.

[14]  "United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JPZW-YNB : accessed 04 Feb 2013), Walter Farrier, August 1971; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

Wednesday, February 11, 2009

Mary Ann McRae, 1857-1930

 
  • Born: 27 September 1857 at Emigration Canyon, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Died: 17 October 1930 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Parents: John McRae and Roxey Abigail Pierce
  • Spouse: Walter Davidson (md. 1 Jan 1876 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah)
  • Children: Walter Daniel Davidson, Franklin John Davidson, Agnes Davidson, James Matthew Davidson, Florence Davidson

1857 September 27
Born at Emigration Canyon, Salt Lake, Utah, first child of John McRae and Roxey Abigail Pierce  [1]

1876 January 1
Age 18
Marries Walter Frank Davidson in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

1876 October 17
Age 19
Birth of first child, Walter Daniel Davidson  [2]

1878 June 29
Age 20
Birth of second child, John Franklin Davidson  [3]

1880 February 8
Age 22
Birth of third child, Agnes Davidson  [4]

1882 May 2
Age 24
Birth of fourth child, James Matthew Davidson  [5]

1882 May 3
Age 24
Death of mother, Roxy Abigail Pierce McRae in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [6]

1885 October 13
Age 28
Birth of fifth and last child, Florence Davidson  [7]

1900 June 8 & 9
Age 42
Living in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah with husband Walter and children Walter D. (age 24), John F. (age 22), Agnes (age 20), James M. (age 18), and Florence (age 17).  [8]

1910 April 26-30
Age 52
Living in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah with husband Walter  [9]

1912 February 28
Age 55
Death of father, John McRae in Rigby, Jefferson, Idaho  [10]

1920
Age 63
Living in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah with husband Walter and son Walter D. (age 42).  [11]

1924 November 27
Age 67
Death of husband Walter Davidson in Salt Lake City, Utah.  [12]

1930 October 17
Age 73
Dies in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.  Buried 20 October 1930 at Mount Olivet Cemetery [1]


---------------------------------------------
[1]  "Utah, Deaths and Burials, 1888-1946," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F85C-2LN : accessed 06 Feb 2013), Mary Ann Davidson, 27 Sep 1857.

[2]  "Utah, Deaths and Burials, 1888-1946," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F85H-Y3T : accessed 06 Feb 2013), Walter Daniel Davidson, 17 Oct 1876.

[3]  "Utah, Deaths and Burials, 1888-1946," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F852-53N : accessed 06 Mar 2013), Walter Davidson in entry for John Franklin Davidson, 22 Jun 1878.

[4]  Gravestone for Agnes D. Siddoway, found at http://billiongraves.com/pages/record/AgnesDSiddoway/223321.  Viewed online March 2013.

[5]  "Utah, Deaths and Burials, 1888-1946," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F855-3DB : accessed 06 Mar 2013), Walter Davidson in entry for James Mathew Davidson, 02 May 1882.

[6]  "Utah, Deaths and Burials, 1888-1946," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F85N-XX3 : accessed 28 Feb 2013), Roxie Abigail Mc Rae, May 1840.

[7]  Gravestone for Florence D. Derr at BillionGraves.  http://billiongraves.com/pages/record/FLORENCEDDERR/225401
Viewed online March 2013.

[8]  "United States Census, 1900," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MMRG-MTG : accessed 06 Mar 2013), Walter Davidson, 1900.

[9]  "United States Census, 1910," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M5XQ-1TY : accessed 07 Mar 2013), Walter Davidson, Salt Lake City Ward 1, Salt Lake, Utah; citing sheet 14A, family 34, NARA microfilm publication T624, FHL microfilm 1375619.

[10]  "Utah, Salt Lake County Death Records, 1908-1949," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQHZ-S6J : accessed 27 Feb 2013), John McRae, 1912.

[11]  "United States Census, 1920," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M8PK-8Z5 : accessed 06 Mar 2013), Walter Davidson, , Salt Lake, Utah; citing enumeration district (ED) , sheet 7B, family 153, NARA microfilm publication T625, FHL microfilm 1821867.

[12]  "Utah, Salt Lake County Death Records, 1908-1949," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQ4L-ZQ8 : accessed 06 Mar 2013), Walter Davidson, 1924.

Tuesday, February 10, 2009

Walter Amos Siddoway, 1902-1995


  • Born 2 Jun 1902 Teton, Fremont, Idaho, USA
  • Died 2 Apr 1995 Nampa, Canyon, Idaho, USA
  • Parents: Amos J Siddoway and Agnes Davidson
  • Spouse: Velma Lucile Cherry (md. 16 Dec 1931 Dillon, Beaverhead, Montana, USA)
  • Children: Shirley Siddoway, Shirlene Siddoway, Walter Eugene Siddoway

WALTER A. SIDDOWAY
LIFE HISTORY

[The following was written by a dear friend of Walter and Velma Siddoway.  This was read at Walter's funeral service.  The author of this blog did not write this.]

Walter Amos Siddoway was born 2 June 1902 at Teton City, Idaho, at the family home. He was the first of 4 children born to Amos J. and Agnes Davidson Siddoway. He had 2 brothers: Lawrence D. Siddoway of Shelton, Idaho who passed away Dec 13, 1989, and Donald R. Siddoway of Teton City who passed away Aug 1, 1976. His sister is Mary Collins of Ogden, Utah.

The few incidents I mention about his life will undoubtedly bring to mind many others to those of you who have known Walt many more years than I have. Walt loved to reminisce and tell about the early experiences of his life.

A five generation picture. Counter-clockwise from baby: Walter Amos Siddoway, Agnes Davidson Siddoway, Mary Ann McRae Davidson, John McRae, Eunice Fitzgerald McRae


In recalling his youth Walt said “I can remember when the first electric lights and cars came to Teton. Being kids we thought it was fun to go up to the corner a block from where we lived and when a car would come down the street we’d give a fast race with the car. We’d hold our own for about 3/4 a block, then we’d give up and they’d drive off and leave us.”


Left to right: Walter, Donald, Lawrence


Old Mag, with Donald, Walter, and Lawrence

During this time there were no water works in Teton and not many people living in Teton so ranchers would take their stock to a common watering place at the river north of Teton and families also obtained their water from there. On many summer weekends Walt and Lawrence and two other friends would ride horses to what was then known as Pincocks to swim — now known as Green Canyon Hot Springs. It was all open range then and in the Fall it was their responsibility to round up the horses from the hills South and East of Teton. They would camp one or two nights in the forest until the horses were found.

Walt attended elementary school at Teton and one year of High School at St. Anthony 1917. In 1918 school was closed because of the flu epidemic there. When Walt was 17 years of age his family moved to Idaho Falls where he attended his Sophomore and Junior years of High School. He then attended Business College in Idaho Falls and took courses in General Accounting and Typing.

The family moved back to Teton in the Spring of 1922. At that time Walt and his brother Lawrence went to Salt Lake City, Utah and attended Heniger Business College during 1922 and 1923. He was 21 when he completed a course in General Accounting and he then returned to Teton

In January 1931 Walt’s father went into the hospital in Rexburg for an operation. When Walt went to the hospital to visit his father he met Velma Cherry who was working there as a nurse. They went together during the summer and Fall and on December 16, 1931 they were married in Dillon, Montana. Their marriage was later solemnized in the Idaho Falls Temple on May 9, 1946.

Walt about the time of his marriage.



After their marriage they moved onto a farm in the Wilford area and there in 1934 twin daughters, Shirley and Shirlene, were born to them.


Walter with daughters Shirley and Shirlene


In 1938 Walt and Velma contracted to buy an 80 acre farm at Teton from his parents. There were no buildings on the farm so they lived in Teton and Walt traveled by horseback or horse and wagon to and from the farm each day. In 1939 they started to build their home. It was a four room house, but they were only able to finish two rooms that year. They moved into the home in January 1940. There wasn’t a well or electricity on the farm at that time so they would use gas and coal oil lamps. Wait dug a cistern and each week he would have to take one day and haul water in a large tank to fill the cistern. After World War II, in 1946, electricity was made available on the farm and made it possible to have electric lights and indoor plumbing for which they were very thankful and appreciative.

Their house was always surrounded by beautiful flowers and they always raised a large vegetable and flower garden. In addition to farming, Walt had a small herd of dairy cows and also in the winter he worked several years in the sugar factory and later in the potato warehouses.

In 1941 Stake missionaries began visiting with Walt and he was baptized into the LDS Church November 1, 1941. He was ordained an Elder and became very active in the church. He has held a number of positions in the Church. Twice he served as Counselor in the Elders Quorum. He was ordained a Seventy and served as instructor in the Seventies Quorum, as a Stake Missionary, and Assistant Ward Clerk in Teton Ward. Later he was ordained a High Priest.

He was also a faithful Home Teacher. I believe there were few if any times he missed going Home Teaching until in his old age he became too feeble to continue.

Their son, Eugene was born May 16, 1942. In 1948 when Eugene was starting school, Walt was President of the P.T.A. He recalls that they bought the first recorder for the school. He enjoyed being involved in community affairs.

 Unknown date.

It was in 1954 when I became acquainted with Walt and Velma when I began making regular visits to their home for a very beautiful reason. Walt and Velma were very kind and generous to me and I always felt very much at home in their home. I feel it a great privilege to have become a part of this great family. I think that Robert and Karen feel the same way. As grandchildren came along, Mom and Dad Siddoway became affectionately known as Grammie and Grandad. They greatly enjoyed their grandchildren.

Walt retired from farming in 1967, and that year he and Velma bought a camper for their pickup truck and drove to Alaska, where they spent the summer with Eugene and Karen. Eugene was stationed there with the Air Force. Walt said this adventure was one of the highlights of his life.

In 1985 they sold the farm and moved to Nampa, Idaho, to be able to be closer to Eugene and Karen and their family.

In their later years the health of both Walt and Velma began to deteriorate, but they continued to live in their home in Nampa until they felt they could no longer care for themselves. In March of 1992 they moved to a care home in Meridian. Velma passed away 17 Oct 1992. They had been married almost 61 years. Walt was very lonely from then until his on April 2, 1995.

He is survived by his two daughters, Shirley Smith of Boise and Shirlene Davidson of Aberdeen, his son, Eugene, and his sister, Mary Collins of Ogden, Utah. He has 13 grandchildren and 25 great grandchildren. He was preceded in by his wife and two brothers.

Brothers and Sisters, I have a testimony of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. I know that Mother and Dad Siddoway had a testimony also and they tried to live up to the covenants they have made with our Father in Heaven. I liked the Scripture Bishop Chandler quoted at the Memorial Service last Thursday. D&C 42: 22 “Thou shalt love thy wife with all thy heart, and shalt cleave unto her and none else.” Though they may have had some small problems they were totally devoted to each other. They understood the importance of family and that the family can be sealed together as a unit for eternity.

I remember one special occasion. After they moved to Nampa, Walt and Velma went to the Boise Temple and were sealed to their parents. I remember the special feeling I had on that occasion that is difficult to describe. That the sealing power had linked our family to many generations past.

I believe that Mother and Dad Siddoway are having a wonderful reunion and are rejoicing in the good family they have. When we honor one we honor both of them.

--Written by a dear friend of Walter and Velma Siddoway, and read at Walter Siddoway's funeral service.



* * * * *

Front row: Karen Lundquist Siddoway, Velma Lucile Cherry Siddoway, Shirlene Siddoway Davidson, Robert Smith. Back row: Walter Eugene Siddoway, Walter Amos Siddoway, Myrl Wesley Davidson, Shirley Siddoway Smith. 3 June 1989


* * *

Life Sketch of Walter A. Siddoway

I, Walter A. Siddoway was born 2 June 1902 at Teton City, Idaho to my parents A. J. Siddoway and Agnes Davidson.  I was the oldest of 4 children.  I had 2 younger brothers, Lawrence Davidson Siddoway and Donald Ray.  I had 1 sister Mary Agnes.

We lived in Teton from 1902 until 1919.  [Walter with his parents and brothers.  Mary wasn’t born until 1924.]  We then moved to Idaho Falls until the spring of 1922.  In 1917 I went to 1 year high school in St. Anthony then moved to Idaho Falls in 1919 and finished high school there.  The flue was bad in 1918 there was no school held.  Then went my sophomore & junior year in Idaho Falls – 1919-1920.  In 1921 I quit high school and went to Business College in Idaho Falls and took courses in general accounting & typing.  We moved back to Teton in the spring of 1922.  Then I went to Hennigar Business College in Salt Lake City from 1922-1923.  My brother Lawrence and I went to business college together.  I graduated from business college completing a course in General Accost Accounting.  Then I came back to Teton and lived there ever since.  In those days there were boardwalks in St. Anthony and we used to get a big kick listening to the sound of walking on the boardwalks, the echoes you could hear them coming for a block away.

I can remember when first electric lights came to Teton also the first cars to come to Teton.  Lawrence and I used to go up to the corner a block from where we lived and run as fast race with the car.  Of course the car always won.  The first car was owned Jay Williams father.  He made the same run every evening so we’d go up to the corner and wait, when he came down we’d give a fast race with the car.  We could hold our own about ½ the block then we’d give out.  They would drive off and leave us.  We didn’t have water works in Teton.  We’d take the stock right north over west side through James Siddoway’s field over to the river to water them.  People got so they took turns going over there and watching the cattle while they were watering.  Teton didn’t have many inhabitants then.  I don’t think there were over 200 families in Teton at that time.  To go up to Newdale, we would go up to what is known as the Butler corner – go straight south 1 mile turn east and go up the range on horses.  We came out at what now known as Green Canyon Hot Springs.  Then it was known as Pincocks Springs.  We usually made this a weekend trip.  We used to go up every weekend.  There was Irving Archibald, Ern Siddoway, Lawrence and I used to do that until towards fall, then we had to round up horses.  At that time it was all open range.  We would spend 1 or 2 nights up in the forest, get on the trail, when night came just make camp then get up in the morning and go again.  Sometimes it would be someone else’s animals.  We’d always chase them out to make sure.

They had the spring (Green Canyon) up on the hill then.  There was a pool built up there.

My parents were from Salt Lake.  Dad and Mother were both born in Salt Lake.  I don’t know where Mother’s Father was born.  Then mother’s father Walter Davidson migrated to Salt Lake.  He was a sheep man in Utah.  He kept in sheep until he retired.  Dad’s Folks came from England.  His Father was Robert Siddoway.  He was a carpenter by trade.  My grandmother came to this country in her teens then came across with the hand cart company.  Robert Siddoway and my grandmother Emma Jackson were in the same handcart company.  They joined the Church in England.

My Grandmother Davidson (Mary Ann McRae) was born in the church.  As far as I know Grandfather Davidson didn’t belong to any church.

Grandfather Siddoway was a polygamist.

My first church activities was shortly after I joined the Church.  I was made an Elder.  I worked 2 different terms as counselor in the Elder Quorum Presidency.  The first was 1st C. for 2 yrs then there change in the bishopric and I was 2nd C.  When the Church started out with 2 ward clerks I was the 2nd Clerk under Bishop Aaron Ricks.  My stake missionaries were Vernon and Mildred Mortenson and Gordon Johnson.  Jim Skinner was the ward teacher who influenced my life through ward teaching.  I was put in 70’s quorum.  Teacher in 70’s quorum for 3 years.  I’ve been a home teacher for years.  The year that Eugene was starting school the fall of 48 I was Pres. Of the P.T.A.  Orey Clark was Vice Pres.  We bought the first recorder for the Teton School.

Dad went in for an operation and I met your Mother in the hospital (Rexburg) (Harlo Rigby’s) along in Jan in 1931.  Went together until Dec. 16 then married in Dillon, Mont.  In the spring we moved to Wilford.  Lived there until daughters were born, then we moved back to Teton and lived there ever since.  We bought the farm we now have from by Dad.  WE built the home at the farm 1939 and have lived in that house ever since.

The highlight year of my life was when we went to Alaska 14 June 1967 and stayed until 1st Sept.

[Copied from a tape Dad made several years ago, about 1983.]

* * *

Autobiography of Walter Amos Siddoway

I was born in Teton in the house now owned by Jim Thompson on June 2, 1902.  At that time the house was just the three rooms on the west side.  It was built the summer of 1901 by my Father.

Mother and Father were married in June of 1901 in Salt Lake City and moved here as soon as they were married.  I lived there until they sold their home in the summer of 1919 when we moved to Idaho Falls.

The first school I attended was a rock building located where Joe Briggs’ [?] house now stands.  It was a four-room school with two rooms downstairs and two rooms upstairs.

When I was in the 7th grade, the school was enlarged with two more rooms downstairs and two rooms upstairs, making it eight rooms, the largest school for a small town in the valley, and we were sure proud of our beautiful school.  It was used until in the 1930s, when they built the present school.

I have seen a lot of changes in Teton.  The first was the electric lights.  The first power house was back of the Teton flour mill and used a water wheel to turn the generator for the power, and everybody kept a lamp handy, as the electric power wasn’t very dependable.

The first post office that I can remember was located just west of the old garage and was a log building with a dirt roof run by a couple by the name of Poggee.

After the post office was moved, a very modern drug store was built where the old garage building now stands.  It was more modern than either St. Anthony or Rexburg had, and people came here for medicines that were not available in other towns around.  And attached to the drug store was a barber shop that at times had two barbers.  It got on fire one night and was completely destroyed, and it was several years later that the garage was built by several men here in town and was later sold to Mell Searle.  He had the dealership for Ford cars.  The first car I owned I got from him.  It was a Model T and cost me $1150.00 new.

I graduated from the 8th grade here in the spring of 1917 and went to high school in St. Anthony that fall and winter.  I drove a very modern one-horse buggy in the fall and spring and rode my horse while the snow was on the ground, as in those days the roads were not kept open and the snow was very deep, as high as the posts on the fences.  And at times horses and sleighs could not get through, but my horse was very good and I never missed a day.

The next winter, 1918, was the winter that was terrible.  It was the winter of the flu that took so many lives throughout the whole country, about 20 here in Teton.

In the spring of 1919 Father sold our home in Teton to Ward Baker, the father of Ray S. Baker and we moved to Idaho Falls to a very nice home located at 239 11th Street.  The house is still there.  We lived there until the spring of 1923, then Father decided that he couldn’t stand another summer of retirement, so we moved back to Teton and we took the farms back that he had rented out.  And I farmed from then on until my health forced me to retire.

The farm that we now own is one of the farms that Father owned.

When we moved back from Idaho Falls, Father bought a nice home one block north of the main street in town.  It is a yellow brick and is now owned by Francis Ard.

I think that I have recorded enough of my early life and will now say something of another part of my life.

The greatest event, or should I say one of the great events, of my life was when I met the girl that was to become my wife.  We met in the early part of 1931 and were married December the 16th, 1931.  That was during the Great Depression as it has become known.  In the spring of 1932 we moved to a farm in east Wilford.  Times were very hard.  Wheat was selling for from 35 cents to 40 cents a bushel, hay $5.00 per ton, potatoes if you were lucky enough to have very good ones were worth 30 to 40 cents a hundred pounds, and wages were about two dollars for a ten hour day.  At that time I was in partnership with my father in a large flock of sheep, and we sold our wool for from 6 cents to 8 cents a pound and good fat lambs brought about 7 cents a pound.  So you see farming wasn’t very profitable, but everything was about the same, so we had a very hard time.  But we were very happy and we were full of hope and I never got discouraged, although I did long for better times as we had no modern conditions in our home: no electric lights and had to haul our drinking water about a mile in a wooden barrel.  In the summer we had water in a ditch in the field where the horses and the two cows we had could get water.

In those days there were no tractors to do our farm work with.  I had four horses I farmed with, and as there was very little money, sometimes we would hitch two of them to a wagon when we had to go to town for groceries.  And in the winter we used a sleigh if the snow wasn’t too deep, as we lived close to the railroad track.  If the road was closed and the train had cleared the tracks, we would walk to St. Anthony for our groceries, a distance of about eight miles.

In those days the winters were very bad.  The snow would get from four to five feet deep and I have seen the temperature go to 45 degrees below zero and stay that cold for several days at a time.  Our house was very poorly built and there were times when our water bucket which we kept full of water in the kitchen would be frozen in the mornings when I lit the fire to warm the house up.

We lived there from 1932 until the fall of 1934, the fall that the girls were born.  Then we moved back to Teton, where I went to work that fall in the sugar factory in Sugar City.  I forgot to mention that after we returned to Teton from I.F. I spent the next two winters at Henniger Business College in Salt Lake where I studied bookkeeping.  I graduated from there with a certificate as a cost accountant.  The school sent me on a job in a little town in southern Utah by the name of Lund, but when I got there I found that my salary was so low that after paying my room and board I would have the grand total of $10.00 left to pay other expenses for the month.  So I caught the next train back to Salt Lake and left the next day for home and decided that I would rather farm.

After we moved back to Teton, I rented a little piece of ground and raised some potatoes and continued to work in the sugar factory in the fall until they closed the factory.  It has now been torn down and there is a spud sorting plant where the factory was.

I have never regretted coming back to the farm and my schooling has been a big help throughout my life.

As I have looked back on my life, and think of my family which I am very proud of, I wish that I could have taken more time with them for camping trips.

As I have mentioned, our girls were born while we were living on the farm in Wilford.  I’ll never forget what a hard time I had telling them apart and how happy I was to be the father of two beautiful little girls and how much I wanted a better home for them and their mother, whom I love very much.

About two years after moving back to Teton, I bought our farm from my father and in the fall of 1939 I decided to build a home of our own, as after leaving Wilford we had been renting.  So as soon as I got through harvesting, we started work on our home.  I dug the basement with a team of horses and a scraper.  Then I hired a carpenter to help me get started.  We were able to get our home near enough completed that we moved here on New Year’s Day 1940.  We didn’t have the walls finished and very little money, so I got some very low-grade plywood and used that on some of the walls until we could get the money to have them finished right, which we did the winter before our son Eugene was born.  As I have stated before, I am very proud of my family and also their partners and their families.

Farming in those days was a lot different than it is now.  We didn’t have tractors in those days, and if we could work 12 acres a day, that was a big day as we walked behind our harrows, which was a far cry from sitting on a tractor.

I have taken several trips in my life.  I spent some time in Los Angeles in the winter of 1926, and I went to Denver, Colorado when we sold our lambs when I had sheep.  And we visited with Eugene and Karen when they lived in Glasgow, Montana.  But the tops of all trips was our trip to Alaska, in 1967.

[From a hand-written, undated manuscript.]


Robert Siddoway, 1828-1893

  • Born 6 June 1828 Washington, Durham, , England
  • Died 14 August 1893 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Parents: Richard Siddoway and Susanna Clayton
  • Spouse: Elizabeth Dawson (md. 9 September 1849 Sunderland, Durham, England)
  • Children:  Isabella Siddoway, Richard Siddoway, Robert Siddoway, Jr., Susanna Siddoway
  • Spouse: Emma Jackson (md. 1 September 1860 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah)
  • Children: James William Siddoway, Edwin Siddoway, Elizabeth Siddoway, Emily Annie Siddoway, Susan Siddoway, Sylvia Siddoway, Francis Siddoway, Amos Siddoway, Eliza May Siddoway
  • Spouse: Fanny Wilkinson (md. 27 May 1865 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah)
  • Children: Louisa Ann Siddoway, William Henry Siddoway
* * *

Thane Siddoway, also a descendant of Robert Siddoway, wrote a research paper about Robert and his family for a history class at BYU in 1977.  With his permission, I have uploaded his history to Skydrive, and you can read it here.

* * *

1828 June 6
Born in Washington, Durham, England  [1]

1832 August 14
Age 4
Mother Susannah Clayton (Cloughton) is buried in Heworth, Durham, England  [2]

1841
Age 13
Living in Southwick, Durham, England with father Richard Siddoway, step-mother Mary Turnbull, and half-brother John (age 2)  [3, 4]  

1849 September 9
Age 21
Marries Elizabeth Dawson in Sunderland, Durham, England

1849 November 28
Age 21
Birth of daughter Isabella in Southwick, Durham, England. Is christened 4 December 1849.  [5, 6] 

1852 February 13
Age 23
Birth of son Richard Siddoway in Southwick, Durham, England  [7, 8]

1853 December 25
Age 25
Birth of son Robert Siddoway in Sunderland, Durham, England.  Christened 22 January 1854.  [9]

1855 September 30
Age 27
Father Richard Siddoway dies in Southwick, Durham, England.  Is buried 2 October 1855.   [10]

1856 June 15
Age 28
Arrives on Ship Thornton from Liverpool, England, to New York, riding in Upper Between Deck with wife Eliza, and children Isabel, Rich’d, and Robt.  Also with half-brother Jno Siddoway and sister-in-law Mary Siddoway.  His occupation is listed as “smith.”   [11]

1857
Age 29
Birth and death of daughter Susannah in Pottsville, Schuykill, Pennsylvania

1859 May 10
Age 30
Death of wife Elizabeth Dawson in Ashland, Schuykill, Pennsylvania.  Dies in childbirth along with baby girl.

1860 June 6
Age 32
Leaves Florence, Nebraska (now Omaha) with the Daniel Robinson handcart company, the 9th Mormon handcart company.  Is traveling with daughter Isabella (age 10), son Richard (age 8), son Robert, Jr. (age 6), half-brother John Siddoway (age 22), and sister-in-law Mary Jones Siddoway (age 23). Future wife Emma Jackson is also in this company.  They arrive in Salt Lake on 27 August 1860.  [12]

Daughter Isabella later wrote of their journey: "The journey being longer than we expected, our clothing, shoes and provisions grew very scanty long before we reached our destination. Our shoes were so badly worn that at night, after a long day's walk over the rough ground, I would have to pick the pebbles from my little brother's torn and bleeding feet, as well as my own. When we were near Laramie, Wyoming, our provisions grew very short, so much so that each person was rationed to one-half pound of flour a day. Sister Hannah Lapish, one of the members of our company, had some jewelry she had brought from England with her. She took it to a trading post, and exchanged it for seven hundred pounds of flour, which greatly relieved our want until we were met by a relief party at Green River, sent out by President Brigham Young, with 2500 pounds of flour and 500 pounds of bacon which lasted us until we reached the Valley. We were very fortunate in only having one death during our journey, and that being a little child. After arriving in Salt Lake Lake City, we looked upon the then almost barren country, and compaired [sic] it to the green fields and comfortable homes we had left in old England. Was it any wonder that we were hart-sick and disappointed with our new surroundings! With a little band of people, a scattered house and a green field here and there, very little to eat and less to wear, the first few years of our new home-making was very trying. But with one aim, and having been driven from place to place on account of their religious belief, which made them almost as united as one large family, this little band of courageous people turned a desert into the beautiful city we now have."  [13]

1860 September 1
Age 32
Marries Emma Jackson in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

1861 September 14
Age 33
Birth of son James William (son of Emma Jackson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [14]

1863 July 24
Age 35
Birth of son Edwin (son of Emma Jackson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

1864 March 26
Age 35
Death of son Edwin at age 8 months.

1865 April 21
Age 36
Birth of daughter Elizabeth (daughter of Emma Jackson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

1865 May 27
Age 36
Marries Fanny Wilkinson in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

1866 October 18
Age 38
Birth of daughter Louisa Ann (daughter of Fanny Wilkinson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [15]

1867 February 24
Age 38
Birth of daughter Emily Annie (daughter of Emma Jackson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [16]

1868 October 9
Age 40
Birth of son William Henry (son of Fanny Wilkinson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [17]

1869 July 19
Age 41
Birth of daughter Susan (daughter of Emma Jackson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

1870 August 8
Age 42
Living in Sugar House Ward, Salt Lake, Utah with wife Emma and children James (age 9), Lizzie (age 5), Hannah (age 4), Louis (age 4), William H. (age 2), Susan C. (age 8 months), Richard (age 18), and Robert (age 16).  Lists occupation as millwright.  [18]

1871 February 1
Age 42
Death of daughter Susan

1872 January 19
Age 43
Birth of daughter Sylvia (daughter of Emma Jackson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [19]

1874 March 24
Age 45
Birth of son Francis (Frank) (son of Emma Jackson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [20]

1876 September 21
Age 48
Birth of son Amos (son of Emma Jackson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [21]

1879 May 17
Age 50
Birth of daughter Eliza May (daughter of Emma Jackson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [22]


1880 June 9
Age 52
Living in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, with wife Emma and children Jas. Wm. (age 18), Eliza (age 15), Emily (age 13), Sylvia (age 8), Frank (age 6), Amos (age 4), and Eliza May (age 1).  Lists occupation as carpenter.  [23]

1893 August 14
Age 65
Dies in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah [24]


Deseret Evening News, 1893-08-15, p. 5

Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake, Utah

----------------------------------------------------
[1]  "BillionGraves Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/KSG3-MZS : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Robert Siddoway, 14 Aug 1893.

[2]  Burial record for Susannah Cloughton.  Found on PR's Heworth, Durham, England Film 1885534. PR's Heworth, Durham England Film 091095.

[3]  England and Wales Census, 1841," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MQB8-LH8 : accessed 02 Apr 2013), Robt Siddoway, 1841.

[4]  Siddoway, Thane, “The Immigrant, Robert Siddoway : A research paper presented to Dr. Eugene Cambell, Brigham Young University, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for History 490,” unpublished manuscript, April 1977, p. [iii].

[5]  "Utah, Salt Lake County Death Records, 1908-1949," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQ4Y-RVN : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Isabella Siddoway Armstrong, 1930.

[6]  "England, Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JSJ5-MF7 : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Isabella Siddoway, 04 Dec 1849.

[7]  "Utah, Salt Lake County Death Records, 1908-1949," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQ4N-YWL : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Robert Siddoway, 1921.

[8]  "England, Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/J7PX-HF7 : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Richard Siddoway, 13 Feb 1852.

[9]  "England, Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NVPK-1JY : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Robert Siddoway, 22 Jan 1854.

[10]  "England Deaths and Burials, 1538-1991," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JZM5-56J : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Richard Siddoway, .

[11]  Immigrant Ships Transcribers Guild, Ship Thornton.  http://immigrantships.net/1800/thornton18560615.html  Viewed online March 2013.

[12]  Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel website.  Viewed March 2013. http://history.lds.org/overlandtravels/companyPioneers?lang=eng&companyId=255

[13]  Entry for Isabella Siddoway Armstrong in Andrew Jensen, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia: A Compilation of Biographical Sketches of Prominent Men and Women in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, vol. 2, p. 484.

[14]  "BillionGraves Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VT7Z-F6T : accessed 28 Mar 2013), James Siddoway, 1917.

[15]  "Utah, County Marriages, 1887-1937," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F8GX-968 : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Hyrum W. Taylor and Louise A. Siddoway, 1890.

[16]  "Utah, County Marriages, 1887-1937," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F8GK-5V9 : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Stephen Bond and Emily Siddoway, 1890.

[17]  "Utah Death Certificates, 1904-1956," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZL2-YP1 : accessed 28 Mar 2013), William Henry Siddoway, 25 Oct 1950.

[18]  “United States Census, 1870,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MNCT-BXG : accessed 09 Feb 2013), Robert Siddoway in household of Robert Siddoway, Utah, United States; citing p. 4, family 26, NARA microfilm publication M593, FHL microfilm 553110.

[19]  "Utah Death Certificates, 1904-1956," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZLK-MBS : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Sylvia Siddoway Harries, 21 Jan 1950.

[20]  "Utah, County Marriages, 1887-1937," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F8GK-RYW : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Frank Siddoway and Alice Harris, 1897.

[21]  "United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/J1TZ-7TY : accessed 09 Feb 2013), Amos Siddoway, November 1966; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[22]  "California, Death Index, 1940-1997," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VP62-MJJ : accessed 28 Mar 2013), May S Vancott, 1968.

[23]  “United States Census, 1880,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/ MNSV-LG6 : accessed 09 Feb 2013), Robt. Siddoway, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States; citing sheet 15B, family 0, NARA microfilm publication T9-1337.

[24]  "Utah, Salt Lake County Death Records, 1908-1949," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQH1-17W : accessed 9 Feb 2013), Robert Siddoway, 1893.