Davidson and Farrier Family Histories

This is a site for us to upload family histories and pictures of our Davidson and Farrier family ancestors. I have not written most of the histories, although I have put together the timelines. The histories have been gathered from various sources, so I can't vouch for the accuracy of their information.

If you recognize any of these people and have information to add or correct, please post a comment, including your email address if you wish, so we can be in touch. I would love to connect with other descendants of these family members.

Wednesday, February 11, 2009

Mary Ann McRae, 1857-1930

 
  • Born: 27 September 1857 at Emigration Canyon, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Died: 17 October 1930 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Parents: John McRae and Roxey Abigail Pierce
  • Spouse: Walter Davidson (md. 1 Jan 1876 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah)
  • Children: Walter Daniel Davidson, Franklin John Davidson, Agnes Davidson, James Matthew Davidson, Florence Davidson

1857 September 27
Born at Emigration Canyon, Salt Lake, Utah, first child of John McRae and Roxey Abigail Pierce  [1]

1876 January 1
Age 18
Marries Walter Frank Davidson in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

1876 October 17
Age 19
Birth of first child, Walter Daniel Davidson  [2]

1878 June 29
Age 20
Birth of second child, John Franklin Davidson  [3]

1880 February 8
Age 22
Birth of third child, Agnes Davidson  [4]

1882 May 2
Age 24
Birth of fourth child, James Matthew Davidson  [5]

1882 May 3
Age 24
Death of mother, Roxy Abigail Pierce McRae in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [6]

1885 October 13
Age 28
Birth of fifth and last child, Florence Davidson  [7]

1900 June 8 & 9
Age 42
Living in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah with husband Walter and children Walter D. (age 24), John F. (age 22), Agnes (age 20), James M. (age 18), and Florence (age 17).  [8]

1910 April 26-30
Age 52
Living in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah with husband Walter  [9]

1912 February 28
Age 55
Death of father, John McRae in Rigby, Jefferson, Idaho  [10]

1920
Age 63
Living in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah with husband Walter and son Walter D. (age 42).  [11]

1924 November 27
Age 67
Death of husband Walter Davidson in Salt Lake City, Utah.  [12]

1930 October 17
Age 73
Dies in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.  Buried 20 October 1930 at Mount Olivet Cemetery [1]


---------------------------------------------
[1]  "Utah, Deaths and Burials, 1888-1946," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F85C-2LN : accessed 06 Feb 2013), Mary Ann Davidson, 27 Sep 1857.

[2]  "Utah, Deaths and Burials, 1888-1946," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F85H-Y3T : accessed 06 Feb 2013), Walter Daniel Davidson, 17 Oct 1876.

[3]  "Utah, Deaths and Burials, 1888-1946," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F852-53N : accessed 06 Mar 2013), Walter Davidson in entry for John Franklin Davidson, 22 Jun 1878.

[4]  Gravestone for Agnes D. Siddoway, found at http://billiongraves.com/pages/record/AgnesDSiddoway/223321.  Viewed online March 2013.

[5]  "Utah, Deaths and Burials, 1888-1946," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F855-3DB : accessed 06 Mar 2013), Walter Davidson in entry for James Mathew Davidson, 02 May 1882.

[6]  "Utah, Deaths and Burials, 1888-1946," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F85N-XX3 : accessed 28 Feb 2013), Roxie Abigail Mc Rae, May 1840.

[7]  Gravestone for Florence D. Derr at BillionGraves.  http://billiongraves.com/pages/record/FLORENCEDDERR/225401
Viewed online March 2013.

[8]  "United States Census, 1900," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MMRG-MTG : accessed 06 Mar 2013), Walter Davidson, 1900.

[9]  "United States Census, 1910," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M5XQ-1TY : accessed 07 Mar 2013), Walter Davidson, Salt Lake City Ward 1, Salt Lake, Utah; citing sheet 14A, family 34, NARA microfilm publication T624, FHL microfilm 1375619.

[10]  "Utah, Salt Lake County Death Records, 1908-1949," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQHZ-S6J : accessed 27 Feb 2013), John McRae, 1912.

[11]  "United States Census, 1920," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M8PK-8Z5 : accessed 06 Mar 2013), Walter Davidson, , Salt Lake, Utah; citing enumeration district (ED) , sheet 7B, family 153, NARA microfilm publication T625, FHL microfilm 1821867.

[12]  "Utah, Salt Lake County Death Records, 1908-1949," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQ4L-ZQ8 : accessed 06 Mar 2013), Walter Davidson, 1924.

Tuesday, February 10, 2009

Walter Amos Siddoway, 1902-1995


  • Born 2 Jun 1902 Teton, Fremont, Idaho, USA
  • Died 2 Apr 1995 Nampa, Canyon, Idaho, USA
  • Parents: Amos J Siddoway and Agnes Davidson
  • Spouse: Velma Lucile Cherry (md. 16 Dec 1931 Dillon, Beaverhead, Montana, USA)
  • Children: Shirley Siddoway, Shirlene Siddoway, Walter Eugene Siddoway

WALTER A. SIDDOWAY
LIFE HISTORY

[The following was written by a dear friend of Walter and Velma Siddoway.  This was read at Walter's funeral service.  The author of this blog did not write this.]

Walter Amos Siddoway was born 2 June 1902 at Teton City, Idaho, at the family home. He was the first of 4 children born to Amos J. and Agnes Davidson Siddoway. He had 2 brothers: Lawrence D. Siddoway of Shelton, Idaho who passed away Dec 13, 1989, and Donald R. Siddoway of Teton City who passed away Aug 1, 1976. His sister is Mary Collins of Ogden, Utah.

The few incidents I mention about his life will undoubtedly bring to mind many others to those of you who have known Walt many more years than I have. Walt loved to reminisce and tell about the early experiences of his life.

A five generation picture. Counter-clockwise from baby: Walter Amos Siddoway, Agnes Davidson Siddoway, Mary Ann McRae Davidson, John McRae, Eunice Fitzgerald McRae


In recalling his youth Walt said “I can remember when the first electric lights and cars came to Teton. Being kids we thought it was fun to go up to the corner a block from where we lived and when a car would come down the street we’d give a fast race with the car. We’d hold our own for about 3/4 a block, then we’d give up and they’d drive off and leave us.”


Left to right: Walter, Donald, Lawrence


Old Mag, with Donald, Walter, and Lawrence

During this time there were no water works in Teton and not many people living in Teton so ranchers would take their stock to a common watering place at the river north of Teton and families also obtained their water from there. On many summer weekends Walt and Lawrence and two other friends would ride horses to what was then known as Pincocks to swim — now known as Green Canyon Hot Springs. It was all open range then and in the Fall it was their responsibility to round up the horses from the hills South and East of Teton. They would camp one or two nights in the forest until the horses were found.

Walt attended elementary school at Teton and one year of High School at St. Anthony 1917. In 1918 school was closed because of the flu epidemic there. When Walt was 17 years of age his family moved to Idaho Falls where he attended his Sophomore and Junior years of High School. He then attended Business College in Idaho Falls and took courses in General Accounting and Typing.

The family moved back to Teton in the Spring of 1922. At that time Walt and his brother Lawrence went to Salt Lake City, Utah and attended Heniger Business College during 1922 and 1923. He was 21 when he completed a course in General Accounting and he then returned to Teton

In January 1931 Walt’s father went into the hospital in Rexburg for an operation. When Walt went to the hospital to visit his father he met Velma Cherry who was working there as a nurse. They went together during the summer and Fall and on December 16, 1931 they were married in Dillon, Montana. Their marriage was later solemnized in the Idaho Falls Temple on May 9, 1946.

Walt about the time of his marriage.



After their marriage they moved onto a farm in the Wilford area and there in 1934 twin daughters, Shirley and Shirlene, were born to them.


Walter with daughters Shirley and Shirlene


In 1938 Walt and Velma contracted to buy an 80 acre farm at Teton from his parents. There were no buildings on the farm so they lived in Teton and Walt traveled by horseback or horse and wagon to and from the farm each day. In 1939 they started to build their home. It was a four room house, but they were only able to finish two rooms that year. They moved into the home in January 1940. There wasn’t a well or electricity on the farm at that time so they would use gas and coal oil lamps. Wait dug a cistern and each week he would have to take one day and haul water in a large tank to fill the cistern. After World War II, in 1946, electricity was made available on the farm and made it possible to have electric lights and indoor plumbing for which they were very thankful and appreciative.

Their house was always surrounded by beautiful flowers and they always raised a large vegetable and flower garden. In addition to farming, Walt had a small herd of dairy cows and also in the winter he worked several years in the sugar factory and later in the potato warehouses.

In 1941 Stake missionaries began visiting with Walt and he was baptized into the LDS Church November 1, 1941. He was ordained an Elder and became very active in the church. He has held a number of positions in the Church. Twice he served as Counselor in the Elders Quorum. He was ordained a Seventy and served as instructor in the Seventies Quorum, as a Stake Missionary, and Assistant Ward Clerk in Teton Ward. Later he was ordained a High Priest.

He was also a faithful Home Teacher. I believe there were few if any times he missed going Home Teaching until in his old age he became too feeble to continue.

Their son, Eugene was born May 16, 1942. In 1948 when Eugene was starting school, Walt was President of the P.T.A. He recalls that they bought the first recorder for the school. He enjoyed being involved in community affairs.

 Unknown date.

It was in 1954 when I became acquainted with Walt and Velma when I began making regular visits to their home for a very beautiful reason. Walt and Velma were very kind and generous to me and I always felt very much at home in their home. I feel it a great privilege to have become a part of this great family. I think that Robert and Karen feel the same way. As grandchildren came along, Mom and Dad Siddoway became affectionately known as Grammie and Grandad. They greatly enjoyed their grandchildren.

Walt retired from farming in 1967, and that year he and Velma bought a camper for their pickup truck and drove to Alaska, where they spent the summer with Eugene and Karen. Eugene was stationed there with the Air Force. Walt said this adventure was one of the highlights of his life.

In 1985 they sold the farm and moved to Nampa, Idaho, to be able to be closer to Eugene and Karen and their family.

In their later years the health of both Walt and Velma began to deteriorate, but they continued to live in their home in Nampa until they felt they could no longer care for themselves. In March of 1992 they moved to a care home in Meridian. Velma passed away 17 Oct 1992. They had been married almost 61 years. Walt was very lonely from then until his on April 2, 1995.

He is survived by his two daughters, Shirley Smith of Boise and Shirlene Davidson of Aberdeen, his son, Eugene, and his sister, Mary Collins of Ogden, Utah. He has 13 grandchildren and 25 great grandchildren. He was preceded in by his wife and two brothers.

Brothers and Sisters, I have a testimony of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. I know that Mother and Dad Siddoway had a testimony also and they tried to live up to the covenants they have made with our Father in Heaven. I liked the Scripture Bishop Chandler quoted at the Memorial Service last Thursday. D&C 42: 22 “Thou shalt love thy wife with all thy heart, and shalt cleave unto her and none else.” Though they may have had some small problems they were totally devoted to each other. They understood the importance of family and that the family can be sealed together as a unit for eternity.

I remember one special occasion. After they moved to Nampa, Walt and Velma went to the Boise Temple and were sealed to their parents. I remember the special feeling I had on that occasion that is difficult to describe. That the sealing power had linked our family to many generations past.

I believe that Mother and Dad Siddoway are having a wonderful reunion and are rejoicing in the good family they have. When we honor one we honor both of them.

--Written by a dear friend of Walter and Velma Siddoway, and read at Walter Siddoway's funeral service.



* * * * *

Front row: Karen Lundquist Siddoway, Velma Lucile Cherry Siddoway, Shirlene Siddoway Davidson, Robert Smith. Back row: Walter Eugene Siddoway, Walter Amos Siddoway, Myrl Wesley Davidson, Shirley Siddoway Smith. 3 June 1989


* * *

Life Sketch of Walter A. Siddoway

I, Walter A. Siddoway was born 2 June 1902 at Teton City, Idaho to my parents A. J. Siddoway and Agnes Davidson.  I was the oldest of 4 children.  I had 2 younger brothers, Lawrence Davidson Siddoway and Donald Ray.  I had 1 sister Mary Agnes.

We lived in Teton from 1902 until 1919.  [Walter with his parents and brothers.  Mary wasn’t born until 1924.]  We then moved to Idaho Falls until the spring of 1922.  In 1917 I went to 1 year high school in St. Anthony then moved to Idaho Falls in 1919 and finished high school there.  The flue was bad in 1918 there was no school held.  Then went my sophomore & junior year in Idaho Falls – 1919-1920.  In 1921 I quit high school and went to Business College in Idaho Falls and took courses in general accounting & typing.  We moved back to Teton in the spring of 1922.  Then I went to Hennigar Business College in Salt Lake City from 1922-1923.  My brother Lawrence and I went to business college together.  I graduated from business college completing a course in General Accost Accounting.  Then I came back to Teton and lived there ever since.  In those days there were boardwalks in St. Anthony and we used to get a big kick listening to the sound of walking on the boardwalks, the echoes you could hear them coming for a block away.

I can remember when first electric lights came to Teton also the first cars to come to Teton.  Lawrence and I used to go up to the corner a block from where we lived and run as fast race with the car.  Of course the car always won.  The first car was owned Jay Williams father.  He made the same run every evening so we’d go up to the corner and wait, when he came down we’d give a fast race with the car.  We could hold our own about ½ the block then we’d give out.  They would drive off and leave us.  We didn’t have water works in Teton.  We’d take the stock right north over west side through James Siddoway’s field over to the river to water them.  People got so they took turns going over there and watching the cattle while they were watering.  Teton didn’t have many inhabitants then.  I don’t think there were over 200 families in Teton at that time.  To go up to Newdale, we would go up to what is known as the Butler corner – go straight south 1 mile turn east and go up the range on horses.  We came out at what now known as Green Canyon Hot Springs.  Then it was known as Pincocks Springs.  We usually made this a weekend trip.  We used to go up every weekend.  There was Irving Archibald, Ern Siddoway, Lawrence and I used to do that until towards fall, then we had to round up horses.  At that time it was all open range.  We would spend 1 or 2 nights up in the forest, get on the trail, when night came just make camp then get up in the morning and go again.  Sometimes it would be someone else’s animals.  We’d always chase them out to make sure.

They had the spring (Green Canyon) up on the hill then.  There was a pool built up there.

My parents were from Salt Lake.  Dad and Mother were both born in Salt Lake.  I don’t know where Mother’s Father was born.  Then mother’s father Walter Davidson migrated to Salt Lake.  He was a sheep man in Utah.  He kept in sheep until he retired.  Dad’s Folks came from England.  His Father was Robert Siddoway.  He was a carpenter by trade.  My grandmother came to this country in her teens then came across with the hand cart company.  Robert Siddoway and my grandmother Emma Jackson were in the same handcart company.  They joined the Church in England.

My Grandmother Davidson (Mary Ann McRae) was born in the church.  As far as I know Grandfather Davidson didn’t belong to any church.

Grandfather Siddoway was a polygamist.

My first church activities was shortly after I joined the Church.  I was made an Elder.  I worked 2 different terms as counselor in the Elder Quorum Presidency.  The first was 1st C. for 2 yrs then there change in the bishopric and I was 2nd C.  When the Church started out with 2 ward clerks I was the 2nd Clerk under Bishop Aaron Ricks.  My stake missionaries were Vernon and Mildred Mortenson and Gordon Johnson.  Jim Skinner was the ward teacher who influenced my life through ward teaching.  I was put in 70’s quorum.  Teacher in 70’s quorum for 3 years.  I’ve been a home teacher for years.  The year that Eugene was starting school the fall of 48 I was Pres. Of the P.T.A.  Orey Clark was Vice Pres.  We bought the first recorder for the Teton School.

Dad went in for an operation and I met your Mother in the hospital (Rexburg) (Harlo Rigby’s) along in Jan in 1931.  Went together until Dec. 16 then married in Dillon, Mont.  In the spring we moved to Wilford.  Lived there until daughters were born, then we moved back to Teton and lived there ever since.  We bought the farm we now have from by Dad.  WE built the home at the farm 1939 and have lived in that house ever since.

The highlight year of my life was when we went to Alaska 14 June 1967 and stayed until 1st Sept.

[Copied from a tape Dad made several years ago, about 1983.]

* * *

Autobiography of Walter Amos Siddoway

I was born in Teton in the house now owned by Jim Thompson on June 2, 1902.  At that time the house was just the three rooms on the west side.  It was built the summer of 1901 by my Father.

Mother and Father were married in June of 1901 in Salt Lake City and moved here as soon as they were married.  I lived there until they sold their home in the summer of 1919 when we moved to Idaho Falls.

The first school I attended was a rock building located where Joe Briggs’ [?] house now stands.  It was a four-room school with two rooms downstairs and two rooms upstairs.

When I was in the 7th grade, the school was enlarged with two more rooms downstairs and two rooms upstairs, making it eight rooms, the largest school for a small town in the valley, and we were sure proud of our beautiful school.  It was used until in the 1930s, when they built the present school.

I have seen a lot of changes in Teton.  The first was the electric lights.  The first power house was back of the Teton flour mill and used a water wheel to turn the generator for the power, and everybody kept a lamp handy, as the electric power wasn’t very dependable.

The first post office that I can remember was located just west of the old garage and was a log building with a dirt roof run by a couple by the name of Poggee.

After the post office was moved, a very modern drug store was built where the old garage building now stands.  It was more modern than either St. Anthony or Rexburg had, and people came here for medicines that were not available in other towns around.  And attached to the drug store was a barber shop that at times had two barbers.  It got on fire one night and was completely destroyed, and it was several years later that the garage was built by several men here in town and was later sold to Mell Searle.  He had the dealership for Ford cars.  The first car I owned I got from him.  It was a Model T and cost me $1150.00 new.

I graduated from the 8th grade here in the spring of 1917 and went to high school in St. Anthony that fall and winter.  I drove a very modern one-horse buggy in the fall and spring and rode my horse while the snow was on the ground, as in those days the roads were not kept open and the snow was very deep, as high as the posts on the fences.  And at times horses and sleighs could not get through, but my horse was very good and I never missed a day.

The next winter, 1918, was the winter that was terrible.  It was the winter of the flu that took so many lives throughout the whole country, about 20 here in Teton.

In the spring of 1919 Father sold our home in Teton to Ward Baker, the father of Ray S. Baker and we moved to Idaho Falls to a very nice home located at 239 11th Street.  The house is still there.  We lived there until the spring of 1923, then Father decided that he couldn’t stand another summer of retirement, so we moved back to Teton and we took the farms back that he had rented out.  And I farmed from then on until my health forced me to retire.

The farm that we now own is one of the farms that Father owned.

When we moved back from Idaho Falls, Father bought a nice home one block north of the main street in town.  It is a yellow brick and is now owned by Francis Ard.

I think that I have recorded enough of my early life and will now say something of another part of my life.

The greatest event, or should I say one of the great events, of my life was when I met the girl that was to become my wife.  We met in the early part of 1931 and were married December the 16th, 1931.  That was during the Great Depression as it has become known.  In the spring of 1932 we moved to a farm in east Wilford.  Times were very hard.  Wheat was selling for from 35 cents to 40 cents a bushel, hay $5.00 per ton, potatoes if you were lucky enough to have very good ones were worth 30 to 40 cents a hundred pounds, and wages were about two dollars for a ten hour day.  At that time I was in partnership with my father in a large flock of sheep, and we sold our wool for from 6 cents to 8 cents a pound and good fat lambs brought about 7 cents a pound.  So you see farming wasn’t very profitable, but everything was about the same, so we had a very hard time.  But we were very happy and we were full of hope and I never got discouraged, although I did long for better times as we had no modern conditions in our home: no electric lights and had to haul our drinking water about a mile in a wooden barrel.  In the summer we had water in a ditch in the field where the horses and the two cows we had could get water.

In those days there were no tractors to do our farm work with.  I had four horses I farmed with, and as there was very little money, sometimes we would hitch two of them to a wagon when we had to go to town for groceries.  And in the winter we used a sleigh if the snow wasn’t too deep, as we lived close to the railroad track.  If the road was closed and the train had cleared the tracks, we would walk to St. Anthony for our groceries, a distance of about eight miles.

In those days the winters were very bad.  The snow would get from four to five feet deep and I have seen the temperature go to 45 degrees below zero and stay that cold for several days at a time.  Our house was very poorly built and there were times when our water bucket which we kept full of water in the kitchen would be frozen in the mornings when I lit the fire to warm the house up.

We lived there from 1932 until the fall of 1934, the fall that the girls were born.  Then we moved back to Teton, where I went to work that fall in the sugar factory in Sugar City.  I forgot to mention that after we returned to Teton from I.F. I spent the next two winters at Henniger Business College in Salt Lake where I studied bookkeeping.  I graduated from there with a certificate as a cost accountant.  The school sent me on a job in a little town in southern Utah by the name of Lund, but when I got there I found that my salary was so low that after paying my room and board I would have the grand total of $10.00 left to pay other expenses for the month.  So I caught the next train back to Salt Lake and left the next day for home and decided that I would rather farm.

After we moved back to Teton, I rented a little piece of ground and raised some potatoes and continued to work in the sugar factory in the fall until they closed the factory.  It has now been torn down and there is a spud sorting plant where the factory was.

I have never regretted coming back to the farm and my schooling has been a big help throughout my life.

As I have looked back on my life, and think of my family which I am very proud of, I wish that I could have taken more time with them for camping trips.

As I have mentioned, our girls were born while we were living on the farm in Wilford.  I’ll never forget what a hard time I had telling them apart and how happy I was to be the father of two beautiful little girls and how much I wanted a better home for them and their mother, whom I love very much.

About two years after moving back to Teton, I bought our farm from my father and in the fall of 1939 I decided to build a home of our own, as after leaving Wilford we had been renting.  So as soon as I got through harvesting, we started work on our home.  I dug the basement with a team of horses and a scraper.  Then I hired a carpenter to help me get started.  We were able to get our home near enough completed that we moved here on New Year’s Day 1940.  We didn’t have the walls finished and very little money, so I got some very low-grade plywood and used that on some of the walls until we could get the money to have them finished right, which we did the winter before our son Eugene was born.  As I have stated before, I am very proud of my family and also their partners and their families.

Farming in those days was a lot different than it is now.  We didn’t have tractors in those days, and if we could work 12 acres a day, that was a big day as we walked behind our harrows, which was a far cry from sitting on a tractor.

I have taken several trips in my life.  I spent some time in Los Angeles in the winter of 1926, and I went to Denver, Colorado when we sold our lambs when I had sheep.  And we visited with Eugene and Karen when they lived in Glasgow, Montana.  But the tops of all trips was our trip to Alaska, in 1967.

[From a hand-written, undated manuscript.]


Robert Siddoway, 1828-1893

  • Born 6 June 1828 Washington, Durham, , England
  • Died 14 August 1893 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Parents: Richard Siddoway and Susanna Clayton
  • Spouse: Elizabeth Dawson (md. 9 September 1849 Sunderland, Durham, England)
  • Children:  Isabella Siddoway, Richard Siddoway, Robert Siddoway, Jr., Susanna Siddoway
  • Spouse: Emma Jackson (md. 1 September 1860 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah)
  • Children: James William Siddoway, Edwin Siddoway, Elizabeth Siddoway, Emily Annie Siddoway, Susan Siddoway, Sylvia Siddoway, Francis Siddoway, Amos Siddoway, Eliza May Siddoway
  • Spouse: Fanny Wilkinson (md. 27 May 1865 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah)
  • Children: Louisa Ann Siddoway, William Henry Siddoway
* * *

Thane Siddoway, also a descendant of Robert Siddoway, wrote a research paper about Robert and his family for a history class at BYU in 1977.  With his permission, I have uploaded his history to Skydrive, and you can read it here.

* * *

1828 June 6
Born in Washington, Durham, England  [1]

1832 August 14
Age 4
Mother Susannah Clayton (Cloughton) is buried in Heworth, Durham, England  [2]

1841
Age 13
Living in Southwick, Durham, England with father Richard Siddoway, step-mother Mary Turnbull, and half-brother John (age 2)  [3, 4]  

1849 September 9
Age 21
Marries Elizabeth Dawson in Sunderland, Durham, England

1849 November 28
Age 21
Birth of daughter Isabella in Southwick, Durham, England. Is christened 4 December 1849.  [5, 6] 

1852 February 13
Age 23
Birth of son Richard Siddoway in Southwick, Durham, England  [7, 8]

1853 December 25
Age 25
Birth of son Robert Siddoway in Sunderland, Durham, England.  Christened 22 January 1854.  [9]

1855 September 30
Age 27
Father Richard Siddoway dies in Southwick, Durham, England.  Is buried 2 October 1855.   [10]

1856 June 15
Age 28
Arrives on Ship Thornton from Liverpool, England, to New York, riding in Upper Between Deck with wife Eliza, and children Isabel, Rich’d, and Robt.  Also with half-brother Jno Siddoway and sister-in-law Mary Siddoway.  His occupation is listed as “smith.”   [11]

1857
Age 29
Birth and death of daughter Susannah in Pottsville, Schuykill, Pennsylvania

1859 May 10
Age 30
Death of wife Elizabeth Dawson in Ashland, Schuykill, Pennsylvania.  Dies in childbirth along with baby girl.

1860 June 6
Age 32
Leaves Florence, Nebraska (now Omaha) with the Daniel Robinson handcart company, the 9th Mormon handcart company.  Is traveling with daughter Isabella (age 10), son Richard (age 8), son Robert, Jr. (age 6), half-brother John Siddoway (age 22), and sister-in-law Mary Jones Siddoway (age 23). Future wife Emma Jackson is also in this company.  They arrive in Salt Lake on 27 August 1860.  [12]

Daughter Isabella later wrote of their journey: "The journey being longer than we expected, our clothing, shoes and provisions grew very scanty long before we reached our destination. Our shoes were so badly worn that at night, after a long day's walk over the rough ground, I would have to pick the pebbles from my little brother's torn and bleeding feet, as well as my own. When we were near Laramie, Wyoming, our provisions grew very short, so much so that each person was rationed to one-half pound of flour a day. Sister Hannah Lapish, one of the members of our company, had some jewelry she had brought from England with her. She took it to a trading post, and exchanged it for seven hundred pounds of flour, which greatly relieved our want until we were met by a relief party at Green River, sent out by President Brigham Young, with 2500 pounds of flour and 500 pounds of bacon which lasted us until we reached the Valley. We were very fortunate in only having one death during our journey, and that being a little child. After arriving in Salt Lake Lake City, we looked upon the then almost barren country, and compaired [sic] it to the green fields and comfortable homes we had left in old England. Was it any wonder that we were hart-sick and disappointed with our new surroundings! With a little band of people, a scattered house and a green field here and there, very little to eat and less to wear, the first few years of our new home-making was very trying. But with one aim, and having been driven from place to place on account of their religious belief, which made them almost as united as one large family, this little band of courageous people turned a desert into the beautiful city we now have."  [13]

1860 September 1
Age 32
Marries Emma Jackson in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

1861 September 14
Age 33
Birth of son James William (son of Emma Jackson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [14]

1863 July 24
Age 35
Birth of son Edwin (son of Emma Jackson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

1864 March 26
Age 35
Death of son Edwin at age 8 months.

1865 April 21
Age 36
Birth of daughter Elizabeth (daughter of Emma Jackson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

1865 May 27
Age 36
Marries Fanny Wilkinson in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

1866 October 18
Age 38
Birth of daughter Louisa Ann (daughter of Fanny Wilkinson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [15]

1867 February 24
Age 38
Birth of daughter Emily Annie (daughter of Emma Jackson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [16]

1868 October 9
Age 40
Birth of son William Henry (son of Fanny Wilkinson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [17]

1869 July 19
Age 41
Birth of daughter Susan (daughter of Emma Jackson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

1870 August 8
Age 42
Living in Sugar House Ward, Salt Lake, Utah with wife Emma and children James (age 9), Lizzie (age 5), Hannah (age 4), Louis (age 4), William H. (age 2), Susan C. (age 8 months), Richard (age 18), and Robert (age 16).  Lists occupation as millwright.  [18]

1871 February 1
Age 42
Death of daughter Susan

1872 January 19
Age 43
Birth of daughter Sylvia (daughter of Emma Jackson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [19]

1874 March 24
Age 45
Birth of son Francis (Frank) (son of Emma Jackson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [20]

1876 September 21
Age 48
Birth of son Amos (son of Emma Jackson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [21]

1879 May 17
Age 50
Birth of daughter Eliza May (daughter of Emma Jackson) in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [22]


1880 June 9
Age 52
Living in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, with wife Emma and children Jas. Wm. (age 18), Eliza (age 15), Emily (age 13), Sylvia (age 8), Frank (age 6), Amos (age 4), and Eliza May (age 1).  Lists occupation as carpenter.  [23]

1893 August 14
Age 65
Dies in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah [24]


Deseret Evening News, 1893-08-15, p. 5

Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake, Utah

----------------------------------------------------
[1]  "BillionGraves Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/KSG3-MZS : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Robert Siddoway, 14 Aug 1893.

[2]  Burial record for Susannah Cloughton.  Found on PR's Heworth, Durham, England Film 1885534. PR's Heworth, Durham England Film 091095.

[3]  England and Wales Census, 1841," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MQB8-LH8 : accessed 02 Apr 2013), Robt Siddoway, 1841.

[4]  Siddoway, Thane, “The Immigrant, Robert Siddoway : A research paper presented to Dr. Eugene Cambell, Brigham Young University, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for History 490,” unpublished manuscript, April 1977, p. [iii].

[5]  "Utah, Salt Lake County Death Records, 1908-1949," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQ4Y-RVN : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Isabella Siddoway Armstrong, 1930.

[6]  "England, Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JSJ5-MF7 : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Isabella Siddoway, 04 Dec 1849.

[7]  "Utah, Salt Lake County Death Records, 1908-1949," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQ4N-YWL : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Robert Siddoway, 1921.

[8]  "England, Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/J7PX-HF7 : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Richard Siddoway, 13 Feb 1852.

[9]  "England, Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NVPK-1JY : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Robert Siddoway, 22 Jan 1854.

[10]  "England Deaths and Burials, 1538-1991," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JZM5-56J : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Richard Siddoway, .

[11]  Immigrant Ships Transcribers Guild, Ship Thornton.  http://immigrantships.net/1800/thornton18560615.html  Viewed online March 2013.

[12]  Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel website.  Viewed March 2013. http://history.lds.org/overlandtravels/companyPioneers?lang=eng&companyId=255

[13]  Entry for Isabella Siddoway Armstrong in Andrew Jensen, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia: A Compilation of Biographical Sketches of Prominent Men and Women in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, vol. 2, p. 484.

[14]  "BillionGraves Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VT7Z-F6T : accessed 28 Mar 2013), James Siddoway, 1917.

[15]  "Utah, County Marriages, 1887-1937," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F8GX-968 : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Hyrum W. Taylor and Louise A. Siddoway, 1890.

[16]  "Utah, County Marriages, 1887-1937," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F8GK-5V9 : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Stephen Bond and Emily Siddoway, 1890.

[17]  "Utah Death Certificates, 1904-1956," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZL2-YP1 : accessed 28 Mar 2013), William Henry Siddoway, 25 Oct 1950.

[18]  “United States Census, 1870,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MNCT-BXG : accessed 09 Feb 2013), Robert Siddoway in household of Robert Siddoway, Utah, United States; citing p. 4, family 26, NARA microfilm publication M593, FHL microfilm 553110.

[19]  "Utah Death Certificates, 1904-1956," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZLK-MBS : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Sylvia Siddoway Harries, 21 Jan 1950.

[20]  "Utah, County Marriages, 1887-1937," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F8GK-RYW : accessed 28 Mar 2013), Frank Siddoway and Alice Harris, 1897.

[21]  "United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/J1TZ-7TY : accessed 09 Feb 2013), Amos Siddoway, November 1966; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[22]  "California, Death Index, 1940-1997," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VP62-MJJ : accessed 28 Mar 2013), May S Vancott, 1968.

[23]  “United States Census, 1880,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/ MNSV-LG6 : accessed 09 Feb 2013), Robt. Siddoway, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States; citing sheet 15B, family 0, NARA microfilm publication T9-1337.

[24]  "Utah, Salt Lake County Death Records, 1908-1949," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQH1-17W : accessed 9 Feb 2013), Robert Siddoway, 1893.

Amos J Siddoway, 1876-1966

  • Born 21 September 1876 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Died 24 November 1966 Rexburg, Madison, Idaho
  • Parents: Robert Siddoway and Emma Jackson
  • Spouse: Agnes Davidson (md. 19 June 1901 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah)
  • Children: Walter Amos Siddoway, Lawrence Davidson Siddoway, Donald Ray Siddoway, Mary Agnes Siddoway
Amos J. Siddoway

Amos was the eighth child in the family of handcart pioneers, Robert Siddoway and his second wife Emma Jackson.  He was born on 21 September 1876.  His older siblings were James (age 15), Elizabeth (nearly age 11), Emily (age 9), Sylvia (age 4), and Francis (age 2), and five half-brothers and sisters:  Richard (age 24), Robert (age 22, married), Isabella Siddoway Armstrong (age 26, married), the children of his father’s first wife, Elizabeth Dawson, who was deceased; and two more half-siblings:  Lovisa (age 12), and William (age 10), children of his father’s plural wife, Fanny Wilkinson.  Family stories have been passed down that because of the bitterness his mother Emma felt over the polygamy issue, she would not allow her children to be blessed or baptized in the church.  Amos is found in the 1880 U.S. Census at age 4, living at home in Sugar House, Utah, with his other siblings.  Amos’s father, Robert Siddoway, died in 1893, when Amos was age 16.  His mother, Emma, died 23 year later in 1917.


At age 24, Amos married Agnes Davidson, age 20, on 19 June 1901, in Salt Lake City.  They moved to Teton, Idaho, where Amos’s older brother James lived.  The Davidson family were members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, but neither Amos nor Agnes were ever baptized as children, nor were interested in the Mormon Church.  Amos and Agnes had high principles and were very good people and Amos did a great deal for the town of Teton.  They had four children:  Walter born in 1902, Lawrence in 1904, Donald in 1906.  Eighteen years after Donald’s birth, Agnes, at age 44, gave birth in 1924 to a daughter named Mary Agnes.  Her birth came as quite a surprise, but to their sorrow, Mary was born blind.  They employed every means possible to improve their daughter’s eyes, but nothing the doctors did ever helped.  Mary later joined the Presbyterian Church and was active in that religion, married, and had children.

Amos’s wife Agnes was outgoing and service-oriented.  She was one of the first PTA presidents in Teton, where their children went to school.  She also became chairman of the Red Cross during World Ward I.  Amos was active in Teton City politics, and becamse the president of the Enterprise and East Teton Canal, vice president of the First State Bank of Teton, which was the bank where his older brother Frank was the president.  Also, Amos had a very large sheep ranch, and was very prosperous.

Some of Amos and Agnes’s posterity joined the LDS Church:  Amos’s grandson Ralph Wayne Siddoway was baptized, filled a mission from 1956 to 1958.  Ralph’s father, Lawrence, was baptized 28 March 1957 and was endowed in the Idaho Falls Temple in 1958.  Amos’s son Walter joined the LDS Church 1 November 1941.  Walter’s wife, Velma Cherry Siddoway, hired the LDS Church Genealogical Society to research on the Cherry and Siddoway lines in the 1950s.

Walter and Donald stayed in Teton; Lawrence settled in Rigby, Idaho; and Mary married Dale Pass, whom she later divorced.  She then married Frank Collins and lived in Ogden, Utah.  Both of Mary’s husbands were blind, too.  She had four children.  Agnes moved to Rigby, Idaho, to a rest home and died on 20 March 1964, at age 85.  Amos lived five more years and died at age 90 on 24 November 1966 in a rest home in Rexburg, Idaho.

--Taken from Talbot, Margaret Fawson.  Once Upon a Time, the Siddoway Family Series, Book 1, Siddoway Families for Robert and his brother John.  Brigham Young University Press, c2011, p. 88.

* * *
Timeline:

1876 September 21
Born as the 8th child of Robert Siddoway and Emma Jackson in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah [1, 2, 3]

1890 (about)
Age 14
Moved to Teton, Fremont, Idaho, where he worked for his father who operated a sawmill. [2]

1893 August 14
Age 16
Death of father, Robert Siddoway in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [4]

1900 June 14/15
Age 23
Living in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah with widowed mother, Emma, and sister May (age 21), and nieces Isabel Naylor (age 13) and Maurine Naylor (age 9).  [5]

1901 June 19
Age 24
Marries Agnes Davidson in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [6]

1902 June 2
Age 25
Birth of son Walter Amos in Teton, Fremont, Idaho [7, 8]

1904 July 16
Age 27
Birth of son Lawrence Davidson in Teton, Fremont, Idaho [9, 10]

1906 July 19
Age 29
Birth of son Donald Ray in Teton, Fremont, Idaho [11, 12]

1910
Age 34
Living in Teton, Fremont, Idaho with wife Agnes, and sons Walter A. (age 7), Lawrence D. (age 5), and Donald R. (age 3).  [13]

1917 January 28
Age 40
Death of mother, Emma Jackson Siddoway, in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [14]

1918 September 12
Age 41
Registers with the draft for World War I [3]

1920
Age 44
Living in Bonneville County, Idaho with wife Agnes and sons Walter (age 17), Lawrence (age 15), and Donald (age 13).  [15]


1924 November 22
Age 48
Birth of daughter Mary Agnes in Teton, Fremont, Idaho.  She is born blind, but goes on to marry, have children, and lead a normal life.  She also appears on the Oprah Winfrey television program in 1998 in a Mothers Day special. [16]


1930
Age 54
Living in Teton, Fremont, Idaho with wife Agnes D., and children Walter A. (age 27), Donald R. (age 23), and Mary A. (age 5). [17]

Amos Siddoway home in Teton Idaho
1940 April 3
Age 63
Living in Teton, Fremont, Idaho with wife Agnes. and daughter Mary Agnes (age 15).  [18]

1946
Age 70
Moved to Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho upon retirement [2]


1964 March 20
Age 87
Wife Agnes dies at Rigby, Jefferson, Idaho [19, 20]

1966 November 24
Age 90
Dies in Rexburg, Madison, Idaho [1, 2]


* * *


Amos Siddoway Dies at 90

"ST. ANTHONY, Nov. 27 – Amos J. Siddoway, 90, retired farmer and sheepman in the Teton area, died Thursday evening at a Rexburg nursing home of causes incident to age.

"He was born Sept. 21, 1876, at Salt Lake City, a son of Robert and Emma Jackson Siddoway. He received his early education and when he was 14 years of age he came to Teton, where he was employed by his father who operated a sawmill.

"He hauled lumber to St. Anthony, some of which was used in construction of the first bridge across Snake River at St. Anthony, and for the Fogg and Jacobs building on the south side of town.

"Mr. Siddoway moved to Teton in 1900 where he homesteaded and lived until his retirement in 1946, when they moved to Idaho Falls.

"He helped in the construction of the Enterprise and East Teton Canals and was president of the East Teton Canal Co. for many years.

"He was active in irrigation work, was vice president of the First State Bank of Teton and a stockholder in the Teton Mercantile Co.

"He married Agnes Davidson June 19, 1901, at Salt Lake City, Utah. They celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary in 1961. She died in 1964.

"Survivors are three sons and one daughter, Walter A. Siddoway, and Donald R. Siddoway, Teton city; Lawrence Siddoway, Rt. 2, Rigby; Mrs. Frank (Mary) Collins, Ogden, Utah; 14 grandchildren, 17 great-grandchildren; a sister, Mrs. May VanCott, Santa Monica, Calif.

"Funeral services will be conducted Monday at 1:30 p.m. in the Teton LDS Ward Chapel by Bishop John Bean.

"Friends may call at the Hansen Memorial Chapel in St. Anthony Sunday from 7 to 9 p.m., and at the church Monday from 12 noon until service time.

"Interment will be in the Teton-Newdale Cemetery."

--Special to the Post Register [of Idaho Falls, Idaho], November 24, 1966.
------------------------------------------------------------------

[1]  "United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/J1TZ-7TY : accessed 09 Feb 2013), Amos Siddoway, November 1966; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[2]  “Amos Siddoway Dies at 90,” Post Register [of Idaho Falls, Idaho], November 24, 1966.

[3]  “United States, World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/K8QZ-F4B : accessed 09 Feb 2013), Amos Siddoway.

[4]  "Utah, Salt Lake County Death Records, 1908-1949," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQH1-17W : accessed 9 Feb 2013), Robert Siddoway, 1893.

[5]  “United States Census, 1900,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MMR2-9D3 : accessed 09 Feb 2013), Amos Siddoway in household of Emma Siddoway, ED 2 Precinct 2 Salt Lake City Ward 1, Salt Lake, Utah, United States; citing sheet 14A, family 263, NARA microfilm publication T623, FHL microfilm 1241684.

[6]  "Utah, County Marriages, 1887-1937," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F8G2-P7M : accessed 06 Feb 2013), Amos Siddoway and Agnes Davidson, 1901.

[7]  "United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JLP1-TYX : accessed 24 Feb 2013), Walt A Siddoway, 2 April 1995; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[8]  "BillionGraves Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VT7H-RL3 : accessed 24 Feb 2013), WALTER AMOS SIDDOWAY, 1995; citing BillionGraves.com (http://billiongraves.com : 2012).

[9]  "United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/J5H2-TNL : accessed 24 Feb 2013), Lawrence D Siddoway, 13 December 1989; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

10]  “BillionGraves Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VT7H-RZD : accessed 24 Feb 2013), Lawrence Davidson Siddoway, 1989; citing BillionGraves.com (http://billiongraves.com : 2012).

[11]  "United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JT7V-K6J : accessed 24 Feb 2013), Donald Siddoway, August 1976; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

[12]  "BillionGraves Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VT76-MC1 : accessed 24 Feb 2013), Donald R. Siddoway, 1976; citing BillionGraves.com (http://billiongraves.com : 2012).

[13]  "United States Census, 1910," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MLHL-WZ2 : accessed 24 Feb 2013), Amos J Siddoway, Teton, Fremont, Idaho; citing sheet 4A, family 62, NARA microfilm publication T624, FHL microfilm 1374237.

[14]  Gravestone for Emma J. Siddoway, Salt Lake City Cemetery.

[15]  "United States Census, 1920," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MDCV-GD2 : accessed 24 Feb 2013), Amos Siddoway, , Bonneville, Idaho; citing enumeration district (ED) , sheet 9B, family 198, NARA microfilm publication T625, FHL microfilm 1820289.

[16]  Mary A. Collins obituary in Deseret News, Sunday, December 19, 2004.  Viewed online February 24, 2013.  http://www.deseretnews.com/article/1301202/Obituary-Mary-A-Collins.html?pg=all

[17]  "United States Census, 1930," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XHDT-4JS : accessed 24 Feb 2013), Agnes D Siddoway in household of Amos J Siddoway, Teton, Fremont, Idaho; citing enumeration district (ED) 0031, sheet 3B, family 64, NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 400.

[18]  "United States Census, 1940," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VY42-GYD : accessed 24 Feb 2013), Agnes Siddoway in household of Amos J Siddoway, Teton, Teton Election Precinct, Fremont, Idaho, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 22-33, sheet 2B, family 40, NARA digital publication T627, roll 745.

[19]  "BillionGraves Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VT7C-2LZ : accessed 06 Feb 2013), Agnes D Siddoway, 1964; citing BillionGraves.com (http://billiongraves.com : 2012).

[20]  Obituary for Agnes Siddoway in Idaho Falls, Idaho Post Register, dated 22 March 1964.

Monday, February 9, 2009

Mary Amanda Shumway, 1838-1883

  • Born 18 Oct 1838 Randolf, , Missouri
  • Died 10 Jan 1883 Lewiston, Cache, Utah
  • Parents: Stephen Billings Shumway and Wealthy Eddy
  • Spouse: Ebenezer Griffin Cherry (md. Abt 1862 Richmond, Cache, Utah)
  • Children: Wealthy Jane Cherry, Charles Stephen Cherry, Thomas Billings Cherry, Joseph Aaron Cherry, Clarissa Rebecca Cherry, Margaret Ann Cherry, Porter Nathan Cherry, Amanda Drucilla Cherry, Levi Eddy Cherry, Samuel Allen Cherry, Parley Pratt Cherry

Mary Amanda Shumway Manwill Cherry
     "Her ancestors were from Puritans and settled Massachusetts at the beginning of the Plymouth and Salem colonies. (See the history on her mother Wealthy Eddy).

*****

     "Her father was Stephen Billing Shumway who was born 20 July 1806 in Massachusetts. He joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in the first year it was organized, which was 1830, and married Wealthy Eddy, who had run away from her home and family to join the church. Stephen was 24 and Wealthy was 20. They married 6 January 1831.
     "They were the parents of three children. The first two were born in Orange, Rockland, New York. The first, Clarissa, born 30 Nov 1831 died before she was two years old as a result of exposure during the night her parents were driven from their home by a mob. Their second child, a son named Ammi Warren Shumway, was born 16 Dec 1832. Then they moved west as the Mormons migrated from New York to Kirkland, Ohio and then to Missouri.
     "Mary Amanda’s parents were traveling with a small group of Saints to join the Mormon settlement at Haun’s Mill, Caldwell County, Missouri when their third child, Mary Amanda Shumway, was born on October 18, 1838. Her birth caused them to stop over in Randolf County, Missouri for a few weeks, and so her family was spared from the massacre that took place at Haun’s Mill twelve days later.
     "After the Haun’s Mill massacre and other episodes of mob in Caldwell and Jackson counties, Joseph Smith was imprisoned and the Saints were driven out of Missouri. Although very ill prepared for the forced and hurried exodus, the Saints retreated to Nauvoo, Illinois. It was a time of great suffering. The particulars are not known, but the Shumways abandoned their plans to settle in Missouri and headed for Nauvoo.
     "In Nauvoo, Mary Amanda, with her brother Ammi Warren and her parents, was a member of the Nauvoo Third Ward. Tragically, her father died of Appendicitis when she was 14 months old. Two years later, her mother married a man whose wife and baby had died. He was William Dickinson Pratt, the older brother of Parley P. and Orson Pratt. William and Wealthy had four children, but only one, William Jared Pratt, lived past childhood because of the terrible persecutions and circumstances of the Mormon plight during those years.
     "The little family lived through all the Nauvoo persecutions, the martyrdom of the prophet and his brother in 1844, and the expulsion from Nauvoo two years later in the February 1846 when Mary Amanda was eight. They suffered from mob on several occasions.
     "Existing records seem to be a little incomplete as to when they actually left Nauvoo and if William Pratt was with them when they made the trek to Winter Quarters—it would seem that he was not, but he was not (see story of Wealthy Eddy). Her mother tells of doing sewing so the men would build her a little log cabin. It had no doors or window panes, and it was a cold winter. Her mother tells of her family moving into this log cabin and being grateful for shelter. It was storming the same night they moved their meager belonging in. They also had to move their cows that same night. After Wealthy, her mother, put Mary Amanda and William Jared to sleep, she and Ammi went for the cows. On the way both of them felt her husband’s presence and heard him say, “I will often be with you and help you.”
     "They wanted to go West where they could feel safe and be able to worship God unmolested. Obviously, they were very poor and as the husband was absent, they fitted a wagon together, as best they could and used a harness that was made of different pieces of what they could get. Using a horse and a cow to pull their wagon, they crossed the plains when Mary Amanda was nine to fourteen, probably 1848–52. These facts, coupled with the years of their migration indicate that they were among the poor Saints that Brigham Young insisted would not be left behind. He called upon the members of the Church to help the poor Saints, who couldn’t afford to come on their own, with provisions, etc. so they could all be together in Utah.
     "After arriving in Utah, Mary Amanda and her mother and siblings settled in Payson, where they lived for many years. Her mother married William Cornwell Patten in 1854 when Mary Amanda was about sixteen. Her mother had known William in the Nauvoo Third Ward. He was now a widower with two little s whom Mary Amanda’s mother also raised. Her mother and William had one child of their own, Sarah Wealthy Patten.
     "Mary Amanda Shumway first married Daniel Booker Manwill and there are no known children from that marriage. Next she married Ebenezer Griffith Cherry in about 1862 when she was 24 years old. Ebenezer was 24 years older than she was. He had been a farmer from Ohio. He and his first wife Susannah and family had joined the church in 1846 and had crossed the plains in the Charles C. Rich company of 1847. They had settled in Centerville, Utah. Altogether, he and his first wife had 12–13 children between 1835–63. Susannah died in 1887.
     "Mary Amanda and Ebenezer were married at Logan, Cache County, Utah and raised all eleven of their children. They first lived and farmed in northern Utah at Richmond, Cache County, where their first two children were born. The second, Charles Stephen Cherry, born in 1864, is our ancestor. Then they accepted a call from the Church to moved North over the mountains into southern Idaho, following Apostle Charles C. Rich who colonized the Bear Lake region in 1864. When they migrated to Idaho, there were approximately seven hundred settlers there. They settled by the little town of St. Charles in the Bear Lake region, known for its long, cold winters. There they had three more children and stayed until late 1868 or early 1869.
     "Next they moved back to Utah and located in Centerville, Davis County where they stayed until late 1873. Centerville was where Ebenezer’s brother, Aaron Benjamin Cherry, who had also crossed the plains with him, had settled with his family. However, Aaron had already passed away when Mary Amanda and Ebenezer moved there. Three more children were born here. Their last move was to Lewiston, Cache county, Utah about 1874 where their last three children were born.
     "Mary Amanda and Ebenezer had eleven children in all, and they all lived to maturity. Some of their names reflect their family heritage: Wealthy Jane Cherry named after her mother, Charles Stephen Cherry and Thomas Billings Cherry named after her father, Joseph Aaron Cherry named after Ebenezer’s brother Aaron Benjamin Cherry, Levi Eddy Cherry named after her mother, and Parley Pratt Cherry named after her step-uncle Parley P. Pratt.
     Mary Amanda, however, did not live to raise all of her children. In 1883, she died at the age of 45 when her oldest child was twenty and her youngest child was 2½ years old. Her mother’s home became the headquarters for her older children and her seven year old daughter Margaret Ann Cherry went to live with her. Mary Amanda was buried in Lewiston, Utah, as was Ebenezer when he died five years later."
--Author unknown

Deseret News, 1883-01-31, p. 16
* * *

Bibliography
“A Short History of the Life of Wealthy Eddy,” Susannah J. Shumway, private printing for family history, Fairview, Wyoming.

Ebenezer Griffin Cherry Pedigree and three Family Group Records, Family Search: Ancestral File, CD ROM, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Genealogical Library, Salt Lake City, Utah.

The Family of Swanty and Nancy Benson, Geraldine B. Shirley and Oren S. Peterson, private publication.
Gives an excerpt from the Dairy of C. C. Rich about the difficulty of the winter of 1864 and the difficulties in the years following it.

Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Daughter of Utah Pioneers, Salt Lake City, Utah, Volume 7, pp. 536–578, 1946.
Gives details of the early settling of Idaho.

Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, page 801.
Contains photograph of Ebenezer Griffin Cherry. Lists wives and children.

LDS Infobase, Early LDS Membership: LDS Collectors Library 97, 1996, CD ROM, Provo, Utah.
Gives vital statistics, church ordinance data, and pertinent comments about early church member Ebenezer Griffin Cherry and Aaron Benjamin Cherry. All of Mary Amanda’s children are listed, but her name under “Marriage Number 2” is missing.

Excerpt from MY PIONEERS: The Mormon Pioneer Ancestors of Suzanne Scott Jennings
July 1997
Mary Amanda Shumway
came by covered wagon as a child 1848– 1852
Her birth saved the family from being at Haun’s Mill during the massacre.

From http://jared.pratt-family.org/histories/mary-amanda-shumway.htm

Nancy Jane (Rose) Foster, 1854-1891


  • Born 23 December 1854 Carson City, Ormsby, Nevada
  • Died 12 March 1891 Mapleton, Franklin, Idaho
  • Parents:  Jacob Rose and Sophronia Allen (birth parents)
  • Parents: Abraham Foster (adoptive) and Sophronia Allen
  • Spouse: Isaiah Lacey Bennett (md. 25 May 1874 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah)
  • Children: Nancy Jane Bennett, Isaiah Carson Bennett, Sophronia Ann Bennett, Emma Susan Bennett, Thomas Richard Bennett, Phoebe Eliza Bennett, Ada Alzada Bennett, Mary Rosetta Bennett, Zeffie Fern Bennett
1854 December 23
Born to Jacob Rose and Sophronia Allen.  Later adopted by step-father, Abraham Foster.  [1]

1870 August 4
Age 15
Living in Richmond, Cache, Utah with parents Abram and Sophronia Foster, and siblings Abram (age 7), Alfred (age 4), and Alice (age 2)  [2]

1874 May 25
Age 19
Marries Isaiah Lacey Bennett in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

1875 March 3
Age 20
Birth of daughter Nancy Jane in Chesterfield, Caribou, Idaho  [3]

1876 August 30
Age 21
Birth of son Isaiah Carson in Gentile Valley, Franklin, Idaho  [4]

1878 July 22
Age 23
Birth of daughter Sophonia Ann in Richmond, Cache, Utah

1881 October 25
Age 26
Birth of daughter Emma Susan in Richmond, Cache, Utah  [5]

1883 March 12
Age 28
Death of father Abraham Foster in Franklin, Franklin, Idaho

1883 October 19
Age 28
Birth of son Thomas Richard in Richmond, Cache, Utah  [6]

1885 December 4
Age 30
Birth of daughter Phoebe Eliza in Richmond, Cache, Utah  [7]

1887 May 21
Age 32
Birth of daughter Ada Alzada in Richmond, Cache, Utah

1889 January 27
Age 34
Birth of daughter Mary Rosetta in Richmond, Cache, Utah

1889 February 10
Age 34
Death of daughter Mary Rosetta at 2 weeks of age.

1890 July 18
Age 35
Birth of daughter Zeffie Fern in Mapleton, Franklin, Idaho  [8]

1891 March 12
Age 36
Dies in Mapleton, Franklin, Idaho  [9]

Gravestone in Preston, Idaho
-------------------------------------------------------------
[1]  Gravestone for Isaiah J. and Nancy R. Bennett at findagrave.com. Viewed online March 2013.

[2]  "United States Census, 1870," index and  images,  FamilySearch  (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MNCR-PDS : accessed 20 Mar 2013), Abram Foster, Utah, United States; citing p. 10, family 63, NARA microfilm publication M593, FHL microfilm 553109.

[3]  State of Idaho Certificate of Death, State File no. 143841 for Nancy Jane Cherry.

[4]  Gravestone for Carson and Gena Bennett found at findagrave.com. Viewed online March 2013.

[5]  Gravestone for Frank Thomas and Emma Bennett Merrill at findagrave.com. Viewed online March 2013.

[6]  Gravestone for Thomas R. Bennett at findagrave.com. Viewed online March 2013.

[7]  Gravestone for Joseph R. & Phoebe E. Turner at findagrave.com. Viewed online March 2013.

[8]  Gravestone for C. Joel & Zeffie B. Peterson at findagrave.com. Viewed online March 2013.

[9]  Gravestone for Isaiah J. & Nancy R. Bennett at findagrave.com. Viewed online March 2013.


Roxey Abigail Pierce, 1840-1882

  • Born 24 May 1840 Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois
  • Died 3 May 1882 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Parents: Joseph White Pierce and Amanda Mary Heath
  • Spouse: John McRae (md. 1856 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah)
  • Children: Mary Ann McRae, John McRae, Joseph McRae, Eunice Maria McRae, Roxey Adeline McRae, Alexander McRae, Harriet Augusta McRae, William Jenkins McRae, Kenneth McRae, Martha Abigail McRae, Walter Daniel McRae, Lois Ann Minetta McRae
1840 May 24
Born in Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, sixth child of Joseph White Pierce and Amanda Mary Heath  [1]

1853 June 8
Age 13
Departs Six-Mile Grove, Iowa or Nebraska, in Daniel A. Miller/John W. Cooley Pioneer Company, along with parents Joseph and Amanda, and siblings Isaac Riley (age 9), Adelia Delilah (age 7), and Julia Ann Menetta (age 2).  [2]

1856 April 19
Age 15
Marries John McRae in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [3]

1857 September 27
Age 17
Birth of daughter Mary Ann at Emigration Canyon, Salt Lake, Utah  [4]

1860 June 1
Age 20
Birth of son John at Emigration Canyon, Salt Lake, Utah  [5]

1863 July 7
Age 23
Birth of son Joseph at Emigration Canyon, Salt Lake, Utah  [6]

1864 August 3
Age 28
Birth of daughter Eunice Maria at Emigration Canyon, Salt Lake, Utah  [7]

1866 September 22
Age 26
Birth of daughter Roxey Adeline at Emigration Canyon, Salt Lake, Utah

1868 February 10
Age 28
Birth of son Alexander in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [8]

1869 October 26
Age 29
Death of son Alexander, age 1, in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah [9]

1870 July 17
Age 30
Birth of daughter Harriet Augusta in Emigration Canyon, Salt Lake, Utah

date unknown
1872 May 17
Age 32
Birth of son William Jenkins at Mountain Dell, Salt Lake, Utah  [9]

1874 August 24
Age 34
Birth of son Kenneth at Mountain Dell, Salt Lake, Utah  [10]

1876 July 21
Age 36
Death of son Kenneth, age 1 [10]

1876 December 21
Age 36
Birth of daughter Martha Abigail in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [11]

1879 January
Age 39
Birth of son Walter Daniel in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah  [12]

1880 March 10
Age 44
Birth of daughter Lois Ann Minnetta at Mountain Dell, Salt Lake, Utah  [13]

1882 May 3
Age 41
Dies in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah [1]

Deseret News 1882-05-10
Gravemarker in Salt Lake City Cemetery
-------------------------------------------------------------
[1]  "Utah, Deaths and Burials, 1888-1946," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F85N-XX3 : accessed 28 Feb 2013), Roxie Abigail Mc Rae, May 1840.

[2]  Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel database (http://history.lds.org/overlandtravels/home?lang=eng).  Viewed online February 2013. 

[3]  "Married," Deseret News, 1856-04-02.

[4]  "Utah, Deaths and Burials, 1888-1946," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F85C-2LN : accessed 06 Feb 2013), Mary Ann Davidson, 27 Sep 1857.

[5]  “Idaho, Death Certificates, 1911-1937," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FLBZ-QM9 : accessed 28 Feb 2013), John Mcrae, 06 Mar 1923.

[6]  "Utah Death Certificates, 1904-1956," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZPW-MQV : accessed 28 Feb 2013), Joseph Mcrae, 27 Dec 1936.

[7]  "Utah, Deaths and Burials, 1888-1946," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F85R-Y3N : accessed 28 Feb 2013), Eunice Mcrae Johnson, 1864.

[8]  "Utah, Deaths and Burials, 1888-1946," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F858-8X8 : accessed 28 Feb 2013), Alex Mcrae, 1868.

[9]  "Utah, Deaths and Burials, 1888-1946," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F85H-YM6 : accessed 28 Feb 2013), William Mcrae, 17 May 1872.

[10]  "BillionGraves Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/KH66-538 : accessed 28 Feb 2013), Kenneth McRae, 21 Jul 1876.

[11]  "Utah, Deaths and Burials, 1888-1946," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F85G-HGM : accessed 28 Feb 2013), Martha Abigal Mcrae Yetter, 1876

[12]  "Utah, Deaths and Burials, 1888-1946," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F85Q-DHK : accessed 28 Feb 2013), Walter D. Mcrae, Jan 1879.

[13]  "United States Social Security Death Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V3KN-ZW1 : accessed 28 Feb 2013), Minnetta Runstedt, November 1967